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Author: Subject: Royal Navy 2017 onwards
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[*] posted on 13-7-2019 at 05:38 PM


HMS Lancaster Gears Up for Return

(Source: Royal Navy; issued July 11, 2019)

Four years since her last mission and two years since she began a massive overhaul, the Queen’s frigate – HMS Lancaster – is back in the water and preparing for renewed action.

Crew are due to re-join the Type 23 frigate next month, breathing new life into the 4,500-tonne warship which has been a building site since 2017.

The Red Rose emerged from the giant frigate shed in Devonport where most of the work has been carried out and is now aiming to return to her homeport of Portsmouth in time for Christmas as she builds back up to re-join the Royal Navy fleet.

Lancaster – whose sponsor is the Queen in her role as Duke of Lancaster – has undergone extensive upgrades mirroring the major changes across the frigate flotilla, such as the new Artisan 3D radar, improved navigational radar and new-generation Sea Ceptor missile system which replaces the now-retired Seawolf as the ship’s shield against air attack.

In addition, the backbone of the ship has been strengthened with 200 new steel inserts fitted to reinforce Lancaster in heavy seas.

The newly-installed kit will be commissioned in the autumn ahead of planned initial sea trials early in 2020.

Having floated up in February, she was removed from the refit sheds out into the basin where work has been ongoing to ensure the ship’s company meets the move on board date.

From just six crew joining in April, numbers have grown rapidly; 130 sailors are set to move on board Lancaster in August.

“The ship’s company are all currently being trained to take care and protection of HMS Lancaster back from Babcock in August,” said Weapon Engineer Officer, Lieutenant Commander Mike Bray.

“They are also making sure that she is safe in all respects for the crew to move on-board, this involves all aspects of duty watch training including firefighting, damage control, casualty response and so on.”

With new crew members joining in the build-up to next month’s move, it has been a chance to rebuild relationships with affiliates.

The ship’s company headed to the Armed Forces Day parade in Morecambe.

“The team from Lancaster threw themselves into the spirit of the day and enjoyed engaging with the general public and representing the Senior Service,” said Lt Cdr Bray.

“We thoroughly enjoyed meeting the people of Morecambe and Lancaster, and re-forging their affiliate bonds. We are already talking about popping back up to the North-West for training and for the November ceremonies.”

Lieutenant Commander Adrian Legge (Retired) from the Lancaster Military Heritage Group, who assisted in planning events at Morecambe, added: "I hope everyone had a great night in Morecambe and an easy drive back to Devonport.

“Thank you all for your invaluable contribution to Armed Forces Day – you are a credit to your ship and to the Royal Navy."

-ends-
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[*] posted on 16-7-2019 at 12:02 AM


Order for next batch of Clyde built frigates enters ‘negotiation phase’

By George Allison - July 12, 201983



The order for the next batch of Type 26 Frigates to be built on the Clyde will soon enter the ‘negotiation phase’, say BAE.

The first three of eight Type 26 Frigates have been ordered, the next batch will be the remaining five.

Ordering in batches is common for projects of this size around the world and was last seen with the Royal Navy for the Type 45 Destroyers and the five recent Offshore Patrol Vessels built on the Clyde. The Type 45s first batch order was for three vessels out of six, for example.

“We will enter into the negotiation phase in the next 18 to 20 months,” said Nadia Savage, director of the Type 26 programme.

“As we progress through the maturity of the design, it allows us to commit to the next batch and the timeframe around them.”

Asked by The Scotsman newspaper if the company had a contingency plan for any political uncertainty regarding their order and build, Ms Savage reportedly said:

“The political situation will play out. We can’t control that, but what we can control is that entry into service. We understand what the navy’s requirements are and we can work back from that and engage with stakeholders when we need to.”

The Type 26 Frigates will be named Glasgow, Cardiff, Belfast, Birmingham, Sheffield, Newcastle, Edinburgh and London.
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[*] posted on 16-7-2019 at 11:24 AM


British destroyer heads for the Gulf

Tim Ripley, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

15 July 2019

The Type 45 destroyer HMS Duncan is heading for the Middle East to allow the Royal Navy to maintain a continuous presence in the tense region, the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has confirmed.

An MoD spokesman told Jane’s on 12 July that HMS Duncan’s planned deployment to the Gulf region had been brought forward by several weeks to allow the Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose to return to port for routine maintenance. “This will allow a continuous naval presence to be sustained in the Strait of Hormuz,” said the spokesman.

Having previously been involved in NATO exercises in the Black Sea, HMS Duncan was observed sailing south through the Bosphorus on 13 July.

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[*] posted on 18-7-2019 at 08:11 PM


UK ramps up LMM firing activities

Robin Hughes, London - Jane's Missiles & Rockets

17 July 2019


An LMM/Martlet five-canister pannier co-mounted with the MSI-Defence Systems 30 mm DS30M Mark 2 gun on board the RN Type 23 frigate HMS . Source: Thales

The UK Royal Navy (RN) in early July conducted pilot surface-to-surface trials of the Thales UK Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM) – designated ‘Martlet’ in RN service – from a frigate at an off-shore firing range in the Irish Sea.

The trials, in which a five-round LMM pannier was co-mounted with the MSI-Defence Systems 30 mm DS30M Mark 2 gun on board the Type 23 frigate HMS Sutherland , comprised the launch of four Martlet rounds – one test round and three telemetry rounds – at a fast moving FIAC-representative speedboat off the MOD Aberporth Range on the west coast of Wales.

“The current defence against fast inshore attack craft, the 30 mm gun, is highly effective for closer range engagements,” said Lieutenant Commander George Blakeman, HMS Sutherland ’s weapon engineer officer. “By adding the missile to the gun mount, it is anticipated it will extend the reach of the ship’s defensive systems – key to a successful defence against fast craft using swarm attack tactics.”

“The trial, for which we were contracted, was designed to prove to the Royal Navy that a shipborne LMM/Martlet system could track, acquire, and engage a FIAC-type target at sea; we have successfully done this,” a Thales UK spokesperson told Jane’s .

The July at-sea trials follow LMM naval surface-to-surface test firings conducted earlier this year from the Aberporth Range. In this test firing, six LMM telemetry rounds were fired from a land-based Thales/Aselsan Missile Integrated Launcher System (MILAS) mounted on a 6-degrees-of-freedom motion table – with the table simulating Sea State 2 – at a five-metre FIAC representative target towed at a speed of 20 kts at a range of 5.5 km at sea off Aberporth. All six telemetry shots were successful. A seventh combat standard (warhead-equipped) LMM shot achieved a direct hit on the target.

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[*] posted on 20-7-2019 at 09:10 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
UK ramps up LMM firing activities

This seems like a bloody good use of both pieces of kit. I wonder:
1. How expensive it is. To look at it, not very much.
2. How much needs to be done in the ops room to make this work. Again, I suspect not a lot.
3. How much utility this setup would have in an anti-air mode.
Given the ubiquity of the DS30M mount across the RN this might be a great way to add an extra layer of protection to the fleet without breaking the bank.

Come to think of it, the Hunter class are supposed to come with a DS30M aren't they?
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[*] posted on 20-7-2019 at 10:21 PM


1 × BAE 5 inch 62-calibre Mk 45 naval gun
2 × 30 mm DS30M Mk2 guns
2 × Phalanx CIWS
2 × miniguns
4 × general purpose machine guns

The LMM is being produced for two reasons:

- It's cheap to make and procure, so no big deal to deploy and use as widely as possible, hence the fact it'll be naval gun, combat helicopter and STARSTREAK missile launcher mounted...……
- it's got Multi-mode guidance (Laser beam riding and/or semi-active laser guidance & terminal infrared homing)…….
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[*] posted on 22-7-2019 at 11:47 PM


Quote: Originally posted by JimWH  
Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
UK ramps up LMM firing activities

This seems like a bloody good use of both pieces of kit. I wonder:
1. How expensive it is. To look at it, not very much.
2. How much needs to be done in the ops room to make this work. Again, I suspect not a lot.
3. How much utility this setup would have in an anti-air mode.
Given the ubiquity of the DS30M mount across the RN this might be a great way to add an extra layer of protection to the fleet without breaking the bank.

Come to think of it, the Hunter class are supposed to come with a DS30M aren't they?


Not a new idea. We have been able to bolt Spike-LR missile launchers onto our 25mm Typhoon mounts for years, we’ve just never bothered to do so...

As to the gun on the Hunters, not sure it’s been chosen yet, the drawings show DS30M but they are just drawings not confirmed details and we’ve gone pretty hard across RAN for those 25mm Typhoon mounts, which can be upgraded to 30-40mm as needed.




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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