The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  21    23  
Author: Subject: Royal Navy 2017 onwards
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-2-2020 at 11:55 AM


Thales will provide the Royal Navy with advanced mission systems

Posted On Thursday, 06 February 2020 13:43

Thales, as part of Babcock Team 31, has been selected to deliver the digital heart of the UK’s next generation frigates. Thales will be the mission systems integrator for the Type 31 programme, delivering the combat system, communications systems and the navigation and bridge system. The T31 general purpose frigate programme will provide the UK Government with a fleet of five ships, at an average production cost of £250 million per ship.


Type 31 frigate (Picture source: Thales )

Following a comprehensive competitive process, T31, a capable, adaptable and technology-enabled global frigate will be the UK Royal Navy’s newest class of warships, with the first ship scheduled in the water in 2023.

At its height, the programme will maximise a workforce of around 1250 highly- skilled roles in multiple locations throughout the UK, with around 150 new technical apprenticeships likely to be developed. The work is expected to support an additional 1250 roles within the wider UK supply chain.

Building on our global successes Thales is expanding its capabilities in mission systems delivery in the UK. This will generate new jobs and technical skills in Crawley, West Sussex where the new team has been established. A new naval combat management centre has also been developed to provide a space for customers, employees and end-users to train, test and see how our solutions deliver operational benefits and to continuously gain customer feedback.

The Type 31e frigate, also known as the Type 31 frigate or General Purpose Frigate (GPFF), is a planned class of frigate for the United Kingdom's Royal Navy intended to enter service in the 2020s alongside the more capable Type 26 frigate. The armament of the Type 31 includes medium Calibre Gun options up to 5” (127mm) for maritime interdiction, self-protection and engagement of surface and land targets. As well as small Calibre Guns up to 40mm caliber can be located in predesignated upper-deck weapon positions. In option, the frigate can be armed with a provision of up to 8 canister-launched SSGW (Surface-to-Surface Guided Weapons), VL missiles (SAM/SSGW/Land Strike/ASW) up to 32 cells and Close-In Weapons Systems.

The flight deck is designed for a wide range of naval aircraft and air systems, with a hangar that can accommodate an organic medium naval helicopter or lighter helicopter combined with unmanned air systems. Dedicated aviation magazine facilities to store and prepare air-launched weapons including ASW torpedoes and Anti-Surface missiles are provided. In addition, a fuelling system to provide HIFR capability from a proven NATO flight deck is incorporated. The large flight deck provides the flexibility to launch and recover non-organic aircraft up to 15t in weight.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-2-2020 at 12:49 PM


Naval Shipbuilding: February 2020 Update

(Source: House of Commons Briefing Paper; issued Feb 05, 2020)

The Commons Library has published several briefing papers in recent years examining surface ship procurement. This short paper looks at the latest developments which include halting the Fleet Solid Support ship competition, a new in-service date for the Type 31 frigates and Sir John Parker's review of the implementation of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

Parliament has taken a keen interest in the Government’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS). The strategy concerns the procurement of new surface ships for the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (the latter delivers logistical and operational support).

MPs are divided over the Government’s approach towards UK-only versus international competitions for different categories of surface vessels. Labour and the SNP are calling on the Ministry of Defence (MOD) to restrict the competition for new support ships to UK yards to support the UK shipbuilding industry. Some MPs and Lords question whether the Royal Navy’s current fleet of 19 frigates and destroyers is sufficient. There are indications there may be fewer in the mid-2020s.

The Commons Library has published several briefing papers in recent years examining surface ship procurement which delve deeper into the issues highlighted below (see box 1). This short paper provides an update on the strategy and the procurement plans for support ships and two classes of frigates. The latest developments are:

-- The approved in-service date for the Type 31 frigates is now 2027, according to a letter written by the MOD's Permanent Secretary to the chair of the Public Accounts Committee in January 2020. The Shipbuilding Strategy said the first vessel should be in service by 2023.

-- A Babcock International-led consortium signed the contract for the Type 31s in November 2019. The overall cost is just under £2bn.

-- The Government unexpectedly halted the international competition for the new Fleet Solid Support ships in early November 2019. In January 2020 the Ministry of Defence said it was “currently assessing the options.”

-- Sir John Parker, whose 2016 independent report informed the NSS, published his review of the implementation of the strategy in November 2019. He was ‘encouraged’ by progress made in implementing the strategy but criticised the Government’s decision to limit the number of categories of ships eligible for UK-only competition.

This paper briefly explores these developments and Parliamentary interest in the Shipbuilding Strategy.

Click here for the full report (7 PDF pages), on the UK Parliament website.

http://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/CBP-8...

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-2-2020 at 12:51 PM


Royal Navy’s Drones Trials Team Take to Sea

(Source: Royal Navy; issued Feb 05, 2020)


The Royal Navy’s 700X Naval Air Squadron have been working over the past few months to trial unmanned equipment and its suitability for future operations; here, it trials operating a Puma small UAV from HMS Mersey. (RN photo)

Their job is to test and operate drones for possible use by the Royal Navy. And 700X Naval Air Squadron have been working hard over the past few months to trial unmanned equipment and its suitability for future operations.

Based at Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose, 700X has taken to the sea in the latest step of its pioneering adventure into remotely-piloted air systems.

They headed out for a week of trials on board the fishery protection ship HMS Mersey.

700X commanding officer Lieutenant Commander Justin Matthews said it was a hugely exciting time to be at the cutting-edge of UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) technology.

“These remotely-piloted systems can act as an extension to a ship’s suite of sensors and potentially as a weapon delivery platform,” he said.

“We’ve set up this new flight to test that concept as a capability. We want to be able to demonstrate how you could take any generic UAV, fly it from a ship, and get its information back in a meaningful way.

“Although we continue to work with industry, this is about the Royal Navy flying a Royal Navy UAV from a Royal Navy ship. That is a fabulously exciting concept.”

The team are using an existing air system known as Puma, which can be launched and recovered from ships.

Lieutenant Commander Matthews added: “The Puma is just one air system. It can stay up for two-and-a-half hours and it has a really good camera.

“Will we use it the future? Well, it’s a starting point.

“For the Royal Marines for example, this is an awesome piece of kit. In other areas, we need to assess its utility across the differing requirements of vessels.

“It’s important to remember that new technologies are coming through all the time. The most important aspect of our work is not about the air vehicle itself however. While we’ve done some work already on civilian boats, this trial is about how a Royal Navy ship can use these remotely-piloted-vehicles.

“We’ll be exploring how you get the information back in a way which can make a difference.

“It needs to go to the operations room or the bridge. What is the best way of launching and retrieving these vehicles which is not going to impact the ship? These are the kinds of issues we have to tackle.

“I am especially pleased that we will back on Mersey, because 700X previously went on board the same ship during an operation and used quadcopters. This is a natural progression to move into this more sophisticated air system.”

700X plays the lead role in all aspects of remotely-piloted systems, such as testing and evaluating drones from industry at Predannack airfield on the Lizard peninsula, close to RNAS Culdrose.

To help the squadron get to grips with remotely-piloted aviation, they spent time in the USA.

In Huntsville, Alabama, they received training on the Puma and Wasp air systems and learned how to operate the aircraft in various scenarios.

With a mixture of classroom and practical training, the team learnt how to launch and recover the vehicles in a variety of modes from purely manual to autonomous.

Back in the UK, they put these skills into practise, launching the Puma at Predannack – a landmark moment for the team.

The squadron also recently hosted a visit by an admiral from the Brazilian Navy, who was keen to see for himself the progress made by the Royal Navy.

In a recent joint exercise with NavyX, the Royal Navy’s experts in getting unmanned technology rapidly to the frontline, the squadron supplied the air power with live video of ‘enemy soldiers’ passed back to HQ ahead of the Royal Marines storming a beach in north Devon.

The marines working with 700X will also be taking systems on exercise to Norway soon.

The other major aspect of the squadron’s work is in delivering training courses across defence from RNAS Culdrose in the use of quadcopters. The squadron’s team of instructors train not just naval personnel but also the Army and RAF in the use of these useful drones on the battlefield.

An important milestone comes this month when 700X will have taught its 700th student.

Lieutenant Commander Matthews added: “I think we are in a very exciting time and I am really pleased with the progress we’ve made so far. As we move forward and take this technology to sea, we are leading the way in developing a new capability for the Royal Navy. We are at the start of that adventure.”

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-2-2020 at 12:52 PM


Type 31 Frigate in-service date slips by four years

By George Allison - February 7, 2020



The Public Accounts Committee was recently informed by the Permanent Secretary for Defence that the first Type 31 Frigate will be in the water by 2023 and that the in-service date will be in 2027.

Earlier statements however indicated that the in-service date would be 2023.

According to the February 2020 update of the ‘Naval shipbuilding‘ research briefing in the House of Commons Library, the approved in-service date for the Type 31 frigates is now 2027, according to a letter written by the MOD’s Permanent Secretary to the chair of the Public Accounts Committee in January 2020.

The National Shipbuilding Strategy said the first vessel should be in service by 2023.

According to the research paper, when Babcock was selected as the preferred bidder in September 2019, the company said manufacture would commence in 2021 with the first ship “scheduled for launch in 2023”.

Noting the change in language, respected defence commentator Save the Royal Navy said in an article quoted in the research paper: “There is a big difference between the launch of the structurally complete hull and a fully functioning warship that is actually in service.”

If not for this work by Save The Royal Navy, this slippage might have gone unnoticed by most.

https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/

The research paper goes on to say:

“On 20 January 2020 the MOD informed the Public Accounts Committee the approved inservice date for the first ship is 2027: Evaluation of the Preferred Bidder’s schedule and deliverability assessment has confirmed that Ship 1 will be in the water in 2023, with all ships accepted off-contract by the end of 2028. The IAC [Investment Approvals Committee] has approved the InService Date of Ship 1 for May 2027.”

The Ministry of Defence also reportedly told the Commons Library “the competition we held demonstrated that no bidder could achieve a ship in the water before 2023” but suggested to the author that the in-service date could be earlier than 2027.

You can find the research briefing here.

https://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Sum...

© 2014-2019 UK Defence Journal, all rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-2-2020 at 12:58 PM


So it's NOT a slippage per se, just a more accurate reflection of how long it will take from launch, although why it will take four years is beyond me?

12-18 months should be more than adequate for weapons installation, seeing as most of the installations should be external systems, with internal systems already installed during modular building process, and it is going to be a modular process. The modular approach allows you to pre-commission the vast majority of internal part or whole systems.

Acceptance Trials and final commissioning should only be another 12-18 months MAXIMUM.

So, here we have a 2-3 year programme, not a 4 year one!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-2-2020 at 01:04 PM


First F-35 nighttime carrier landings in UK waters take place

By George Allison - February 7, 20209


Image Crown Copyright 2020

Four F-35 Lightning jets have completed the first nighttime carrier landings on HMS Queen Elizabeth in UK waters.

The Ministry of Defence say in a news release that ‘Exercise Lightning Fury’ over the North Sea was aimed at ensuring 207 Squadron achieves essential carrier flying and Landing Signals Officer (LSO) supervisory qualifications.

Of course, the first night landings on the vessel itself occurred during the WESTLANT18 deployment off the US coast, an image from that deployment is below.


F-35Bs on HMS Queen Elizabeth in 2018.

HMS Queen Elizabeth recently sailed from her home port of Portsmouth to conduct training with UK F-35 Lightning jets in home waters. Specifically, the ship is sailing to conduct Carrier Qualifications as well as Landing Signal Officer qualifications with 207 Squadron, the UK’s F-35 Lightning training squadron.
Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:

“Few countries in the world have the capacity and technology to deploy fighter jets from an aircraft carrier in the North Sea. These trials put the UK at the helm of 5th generation warfighting and cement the UK as a Tier 1 military power.”
Commander UK Strike Force, Mike Utley said:

“Operating the UK’s Lightning Force from the deck of HMS Queen Elizabeth in UK waters is a significant milestone, and one we are delighted to have shown the Secretary of State for Defence in person.

This training with 207 Squadron will set the conditions for valuable warfighting exercises later this year between the operational Squadron and the ship. The future utility of these tremendous UK Defence assets is gaining clarity each day as we push the envelope of their combined ability, leading to the first combined operational deployment of the carrier strike capability next year.”

824 Naval Air Squadron personnel have also been honing their night flying & submarine hunting skills on HMS Queen Elizabeth. 824 Naval Air Squadron is based at RNAS Culdrose and is equipped with eight Merlin helicopters.

The Ministry of Defence say that the UK will declare Initial Operating Capability for Carrier Strike by the end of 2020.
The first operational deployment for HMS Queen Elizabeth, 617 Squadron and a squadron of US Marine Corps Lightning jets is due to take place in 2021. The carrier will deploy with two frigates, two destroyers, a nuclear submarine and support vessels.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-2-2020 at 10:38 AM


UK Trafalgar-class submarine HMS Trenchant extended in service

Tim Ripley, London - Jane's Navy International

11 February 2020

A 31-year-old Trafalgar-class nuclear-powered attack submarine (SSN) is being kept in service for another year by the UK Royal Navy (RN) after construction delays prevented its replacement joining the fleet, Jane's has learned.

RN sources told Jane's on 10 February that HMS Trenchant will have to remain at sea until the fourth Astute-class submarine, the future HMS Audacious , is handed over to BAE Systems in early 2021 after hitting a 17-month delay in the company's Barrow-in-Furness shipyard.

The extension in service of Trenchant is the latest consequence of the delays to Audacious , which was originally due to begin its sea trials in late 2018.

(131 of 500 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-2-2020 at 09:13 AM


13 February 2020 News

Tobias Ellwood: Royal Navy should buy modular warships – exclusive

By Harry Lye


Tobias Ellwood speaks in the House of Commons.

In an exclusive interview for Naval Technology’s sister magazine Global Defence Technology, MP and Chair of the Commons Defence Select Committee Tobias Ellwood said there was not nearly enough investment in the Royal Navy and that it should look to procure more modular equipment to better fill capabilities.

In a wide-ranging interview to be published in April, the MP said that often Royal Navy procurement is dictated by ministers ‘who do not necessarily have the experience of what is required’ to effectively make the most of procurement projects.

When asked by Naval Technology if enough was being invested in the Royal Navy, Ellwood said: “No, not at all. For the very reasons that we overcomplicate the equipment. Our ships, it is often the case that the procurement processes are advanced by admirals who, from their own experience, tell ministers who do not necessarily have the experience, what is required.”

In light of this, Ellwood said that the Ministry of Defence (MOD) could look to simpler modular platforms as a means of delivering more ships into the navy that can then be tailored to the different missions they are tasked with.

Ellwood went on to say: “For the last four years [I have been] promoting the idea that like your mobile phone is a basic vessel for which you yourself introduce apps that are bespoke to you.

Why don’t we create a ship which uses ISO container-sized ‘apps’ that you then if you want a big gun on the front, it comes in a plug and play capability, if you want desalination units, if you want missile silos, whatever you want, there are 25 compartments on, and in, and under the ship that can be interchanged which will then allow SMEs to create [systems] in the same way that apps for the phone have flourished.”

Ellwood said this approach would allow the Navy to complete a multitude of missions including policing the Gulf, interdiction, escort duties or work with the Department for International development with a single, cheaper platform that could be tailored for different missions where appropriate.

This approach would mean more hulls can be built more cheaply, onto which navies from the world could develop systems to give their vessels the bespoke capabilities they need for their particular theatre of operations.

Ellwood explained: “If you want to do interdiction, if you want to do police patrolling off the shores of the Gulf, if you want to do escort duties, if you want to do anti-submarine warfare, maritime protection. Or even, if you want to do DfID [Department for International Development] based work, you could interchange these assets, which would allow the basic ship to be a far simpler price, and then, of course, you would sell more, because you’re not creating a bespoke thing where everything’s welded down.”

Ellwood said that the Type 31, due to be built by Babcock, was an example of the Royal Navy taking a step in the right direction by procuring a cheaper ship based on an existing hull. However, he said this did not go far enough as the vessel was ‘still too fixed for what it’s going to do’.

Further commenting on the Type 31, Ellwood said that the vessel would be unlikely to stand out against similarly-sized Frigates from across the world when it eventually enters service. The ship’s design is based on the Iver Huitfeldt class Frigate in service with the Royal Danish. The ships have a relatively cheap price tag as a result of this with the construction of five vessels carrying a price tag of £1.25bn.

Each Type 31 will cost £250m, in comparison to the £1bn price tag for each of the Royal Navy’s newer, more bespoke, Type 26 frigates. The cheaper price tag is seen as a bonus of the navy allowing it to achieve its goal of replacing ageing Type 23 Frigates on a hull-for-hull basis.

There are hopes that the Type 31 will be a lucrative export opportunity for British shipbuilding and attract interest from navies overseas.

Tobias Ellwood is MP for Bournemouth East and Chair of the House of Commons Defence Select Committee, having previously served in government as a defence minister and as a foreign minister.


Type 31 concept image. Credits: Thales/ Babcock.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1078
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 14-2-2020 at 12:43 PM


That concept he is arguing for exists, it's called MEKO, and a number of navies tried it.

Most fitted specific capability and barely changed it from that day forward.

None of the navies that tried it have continued with the concept. (Portugal, Argentina, Nigeria, Turkey, Greece, Australia or New Zealand)




It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ARH
Super Administrator
*********




Posts: 1033
Registered: 10-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-2-2020 at 01:00 PM


MEKO still makes sense from the point of view of the ship builder, who can then manufacture ships to different specifications for different customers, but once built, the 'modularity' doesn't make much sense in terms of making the ships more multi-role / swing-role.

The whole LCS experience / debacle should put an end to the concept of the lego ship, at least for a while.

What the RN needs is just more warships. Not modular warships, just warships.




Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
CaptainCleanoff
Member





Posts: 124
Registered: 16-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-2-2020 at 03:50 PM


Just build more Type 31's, build them to fill a certain role, whether that be anti submarine, air defence, or broader multi role capabilities. The problem is not the platform, it's the number. The Royal Navy is being forced to do more with less, and no number of fancy whizz bang modular designs is going to make up for the lack of ships in the sea Mr Ellwood.

Type 31s are cheap enough and capable enough to be brought up to a very respectable level in terms of weapon loadout, they can fit most modern naval combat systems - so his criticism of the platform is unwarranted. The four boat bays could perhaps be the "modular" section if a redesign could be afforded (or needed) in the design to fit four smaller containerised mission modules for whatever role they needed - of course they would have to forgo the RHIBs if all the bays were used.

That would be a far more sensible solution than the Lego ship idea for the end user.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ARH
Super Administrator
*********




Posts: 1033
Registered: 10-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-2-2020 at 04:26 PM


I still think ships along the lines of the T31 is the missing link in a lot of Western navies these days.

Radar and IR / optic and missile technology has evovled to the point that while it used to take a cruiser sized ship to support a large enough radar and fire control system (i.e. Aegis) to counter saturation attacks. Now the task can be performed by ships in the sub 1,500t category armed with missiles like ESSM, CAMM or Barak, with the larger ships now capable of knocking sattelites out of orbit, which is overkill for the overwhelming majority of tasks. What these smaller ships don't have is the seakeeping and endurance of the larger ships. The solution is to put the lighter weapons armament on the larger hull, i.e. build actual fucking frigates, rather than destroyer / cruiser sized ships that are called frigates to get things approved by treasury.

Just because you have a big ship doesn't mean you have to cram every square inch of it with expensive shit.

As much as people like to harp on how much larger the RN was 'back in the day', little is mentioned of just how many of those ships were hopelessly obsolete, but were just kept in service 'to make up numbers'. Most of the combat ships the RN deployed to the Falklands served little purpose other than to act as a decoy to absorb damage that could otherwise be directed at other more important ships. The RN needs to restock with these class of ships again, only this time technology has evolved to the point where they can be both operationally useful as well as cheap.




Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 18-2-2020 at 01:02 PM


Major Investment Arms Naval Base for Future Warship Work

(Source: Royal Navy; issued Feb 14, 2020)

The landscape of HM Naval Base Portsmouth is set to transform with work beginning on its newest and tallest structure.

It’s part of a £15 million package for 14 Dock which will be ready to take on major warship maintenance next year and will increase the number of dry docks available to the base.

A new gantry crane will reach 68 metres and enable heavy lifting from Type 45 destroyers, or any other class of frigates or destroyers given deep maintenance at Portsmouth in the future.

Lower down, 14 Dock has been drained for the first time in 15 years, 13,500m² of dock surface cleaned, a new caisson fitted and a sonar pit installed to accommodate vessels with hull-mounted domes.

Captain Iain Greenlees, Head of Infrastructure at HM Naval Base Portsmouth, said: “The project to bring a Deep Maintenance Centre of Specialisation for Type 45 destroyers to full operational capability at Portsmouth Naval Base has passed a number of milestones but this is going to be the most visible sign yet of the large investment the Royal Navy has made in modernising our facilities here.”

The crane was built in Holland by Van Haagen Special Cranes and will be erected over six weeks with the Royal Navy’s partner within the base, BAE Systems, managing the project.

Once complete it is set to dominate the skyline; at 68 metres it will not only become the highest point in the base, but once the cantilever section of the crane is installed later this year the structure will also extend over 15 Dock for work there.

A delivery barge brought the enormous components to the harbour. Sections will be moved outside core working hours to minimise disruption to naval operations, with potentially 80 tonnes on any load moving across the heart of the base.

The project is a key part of the Portsmouth 2030 Programme which aims to capitalise on the choice of Portsmouth Naval Base at home port for the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers.

This has brought new facilities for training apprentices, a combined heat and power plant to energize the carriers when they are alongside, refurbishment of 15 Dock and these major enhancements for 14 Dock.

This latest investment at Portsmouth also complements £18 million spent during 2018 modernising the adjacent central workshops in the base’s deep maintenance complex.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-3-2020 at 09:08 PM


First Type 23 to receive PGMU starts sea trials

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

28 February 2020

The first UK Royal Navy (RN) Type 23 frigate to receive the Power Generation and Machinery Controls Update (PGMU) as part of its life-extension (LIFEX) package has commenced sea trials.

HMS Richmond returned to sea on 25 February after an extended period in refit at Babcock’s Devonport Royal Dockyard facility.

The PGMU, which is the largest design change programme for the Type 23 platform since build, has been developed to address existing shortfalls in power generating capacity while at the same time ensuring that onboard generation capacity can meet power demand consequent of new weapon and sensor equipment being introduced to the class.

(128 of 532 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-3-2020 at 08:43 PM


2 March 2020 Uncategorised

HMS Prince of Wales to begin F-35 trials in January 2021: Exclusive

By Berenice Baker and Harry Lye


Captain Darren Houston said F-35 trials would start aboard HMS Prince of Wales in January 2021

The Royal Navy’s newest aircraft carrier, HMS Prince of Wales, will begin fixed-wing trials with the F-35 in January 2021, the ship’s commanding officer has told Naval Technology.

Speaking on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier while docked in Liverpool on Saturday, HMS Prince of Wales’ commanding officer Captain Darren Houston outlined the timeline for the ship’s future trials, including when fixed-wing aircraft would begin trials on the ship.

Rotary wing aircraft, like the Merlin helicopter, will be trialled first before progressing to the F-35. Basic sea trials will continue with the ship through autumn, clearing the way for further operations.

Houston told Naval Technology: “This year is really about generation of the ship itself, the internal aspects but also the external. The first part is really making sure we are able to take helicopters and we build up the deck experience and also the pilots and the aircrew as well.

“So we’ll have the Merlin helicopters a bit later on, but later on this year we will do some more work with them and then into the autumn we commence our basic sea training and that tests every aspect of the ship. That’s all about the fight, the float, the move, the self-protect and the aviation parts of our business.”

Houston, who was number two in command during HMS Queen Elizabeth’s flight trials last year and served previously on HMS Illustrious, went on to say that these initial trials will progress the ship towards embarking and trialling F-35 aircraft on board.

He said: “That then leads us into fixed-wing trials which are beginning in January 2021. That is when we will go out to the United States, to the East Coast, and we will embark our F-35s.”

He added that while they will be putting the F-35s ‘through their paces’, the crew would be doing the same with the ship to train for all weather conditions to build difficult datapoints for operations in high sea states and heavy winds. Houston said the trials would take the aircraft and the ship to the ‘highest end of its envelope’.

The Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers are the only ships in the world built and designed around F-35 operations, earning it the moniker of a ‘fifth-generation’ ship among its crew.

Operating two vessels makes the UK’s Royal Navy the premier European carrier force within NATO.

Asked if, as some critics have complained, the ships were a waste of money and if aircraft carriers were obsolete, Houston said that if China is building its own carriers, they are still relevant.

He explained: “For those that say no, they are an outdated thing, I’d look very carefully why China has just built a second one and has another in service. We need to be able to react, and be on the world stage.”

HMS Prince of Wales was in Liverpool for a visit named Operation Heartland, during which some 30,000 visitors are expected to be welcomed on board. The ship is affiliated to Liverpool and Bristol.

The second-in-class ship is seen by its crew as the ‘biggest and fastest’ in the Royal Navy, being four metres longer and as much as three knots faster than its sister ship, HMS Queen Elizabeth.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-3-2020 at 02:21 PM



Image via Cammell Laird.

RFA Fort Victoria returns to sea following dry-docking at Cammell Laird

By George Allison - March 4, 20204

One of the largest vessels operated by the Ministry of Defence, the Royal Fleet Auxiliary’s Fort Victoria, has returned to sea following a dry-docking period at Cammell Laird in Birkenhead.

According to Cammell Laird, the vessel has undergone a 30-year special survey on the supply ship that plays a key role at the forefront of Royal Navy operations.

RFA Fort Victoria sailed from Cammell Laird’s non-tidal wet basin bound for Loch Striven in Scotland in January, having undergone a major programme of work carried out under a 10-year Through Life Support contract awarded to the marine engineering services provider in 2018.

Key aspects of the ship’s 30-year special survey included inspections and maintenance of RFA Fort Victoria’s main engines, propulsion systems and steering equipment. All of the ship’s side valves, more than 230, were also inspected and serviced. The vessel’s ballast valve operation remote control was upgraded, along with its stores and Replenishment at Sea (RAS) cranes. A full tank survey was carried out and a new hangar crane installed.

The latest work followed a two-phase life extension programme completed by Cammell Laird in 2018, designed to keep RFA Fort Victoria in service.

John Kennedy, MoD Programme Director at Cammell Laird, said:

“Merseyside is once again a major hub for shipbuilding, ship repair, conversions and refits, and we’re only too pleased to be using our world-class skills and facilities to support the RFA Flotilla. During the past decade we have established a strong relationship with the RFA and built up considerable expertise.

The workforce’s in-depth knowledge of RFA Fort Victoria is invaluable – it allows us to strive for continuous improvement, provide value for money for UK taxpayers and maximise the availability of these ships for the RFA.”

During her time in dry dock, RFA Fort Victoria’s port and starboard propellers, propeller shafts, inner and outer stern seals, all intermediate shafts, shaft couplings and bearing blocks were unshipped from their normal working positions and presented to the class surveyor before being refitted. The ship’s propulsion line gearboxes were inspected at the same time, which in turn allowed engineers to inspect and renew major items on both clutches, and refurbish two shaft brakes.

In addition, the ship’s lifeboats and lifeboat davits were put through a programme of testing and maintenance, while steelwork surveys and repairs were carried out in one of the ship’s lift shafts.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-3-2020 at 02:27 PM


Type 31 Frigate ‘may or may not’ be fitted with anti-ship missiles

By George Allison - March 4, 2020116



The Type 31 Frigate fit out could potentially include an anti-ship missile system, is one really required though?

Kevan Jones, MP for Durham, asked via a written Parliamentary question:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Type 31 will possess an anti-ship-missile capability.”

Jeremy Quin, Minister of State for the Ministry of Defence, replied:

“Flexible by design, the Type 31 frigates will be adaptable to a range of capabilities, which may include an anti-ship missile system.”

The British government released a Request for information detailing the desired characteristics of the Type 31e, this included a Medium Calibre Gun ≥ 57mm, a point defence anti-air missile system and the optional ability to launch and recover unmanned aerial vehicles. Notably the RFI does not include anti-ship missile systems.

Will this be a problem? Probably not, the ships aren’t likely to be tasked to do anything that requires them.

Be under no illusion, this is primarily a result of funding.

Type 26 will cover the high end tasks and Type 31 will generally cover low end constabulary work.

During a 2016 Defence Select Committee hearing, First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones described the vessel that would become Type 31e as “to be a much less high-end ship. It is still a complex warship, and it is still able to protect and defend and to exert influence around the world, but it is deliberately shaped with lessons from wider industry and off-the-shelf technology to make it more appealing to operate at a slightly lower end of Royal Navy operations”.

The requirements any design must meet.

IHS Janes described it as a “credible frigate” that will cover “maritime security, maritime counter-terrorism and counter-piracy operations, escort duties, and naval fire support sitting between the high-end capability delivered by the Type 26 and Type 45, and the constabulary-oriented outputs to be delivered by the five planned River-class Batch 2 OPVs”.

So there we have it, they could be fitted but they probably aren’t needed.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-3-2020 at 02:33 PM


This crass stupidity has been going on for at least the last 20 years, not just related to Type 31...…..it's impacted by the delays in the development of the MBDA super duper cruise missile, anti-surface target development, that will not be available until late in the 20's at the earliest. Meantime HARPOON is running out of life in the current stock-holding, is archaic in any case, and little/no stealth...……...there is also no upgrade programme as matters currently stand.

The RN (and the RAN) are so short of any sensible Frigate numbers and capability, quite literally, everything that floats should be armed to the teeth!!!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Mupp
Member





Posts: 140
Registered: 28-4-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: Benighly aggressive.

[*] posted on 6-3-2020 at 12:51 AM



Royal Navy To Get First Large Autonomous Submarine
H I Sutton

The Royal Navy have awarded a contract for what may be the world’s largest underwater drone. Armed submarine drones are just around the corner and the U.K.’s Royal Navy does not intend to be left behind. The XLUUV (extra-large unmanned underwater vehicle) will be 100 feet long and have the capacity to be armed. This means that Britain is joining the U.S. in leading world development of full-sized underwater combat drones.
Royal Navy XLUUV

The Royal Navy's new underwater drone may be 100 feet long, which is larger even than the U.S. ... [+] H I Sutton (author)

The news was shared by Admiral Anthony Radakin, First Sea Lord of the Admiralty, at the Underwater Defence & Security conference Thursday. The event, taking place in Southampton, United Kingdom, is attended by NATO and NATO-friendly navies and defense firms.

The Royal Navy does not have plans to increase the number of Astute Class nuclear powered attack submarines or next generation SSN(R). So XLUUVs could be a cheaper force multiplier.

Having an XLUUV is significant as it will allow the Royal Navy to learn how to use them. Building them is one challenge, developing the tactics and doctrine is another. The future may favor the early movers such as the Royal Navy and U.S. Navy who learn how to use them effectively.
Today In: Aerospace & Defense

Steve Hall, Chief Executive of the Society for Underwater Technology (SUT), says that there are other challenges which this project will help the Royal Navy overcome. XLUUVs will take the International Rules of the Road, the maritime law designed to prevent collisions, into uncharted territory. And adding an armament will further complicate the law. This situation is similar to when armed aerial drones were first being used. Aerial drones generally have a human in the loop before the weapon is fired, but this may not be practical for an autonomous submarine.

The contract has been awarded to U.K. based MSubs Ltd, part of the Submergence Group. The company has a history of building midget submarines and large autonomous underwater vehicles. Customers include the U.S. Navy SEALs, whose new Dry Combat Submersible (DCS) is entering service. The U.S. Navy’s own XLUUV, the Orca, is being built by Boeing however.



One of the most ambitious aspect of the Royal Navy XLUUV is that it will have a range of around 3,450 miles (3,000 nautical miles). This implies a diesel-electric or air-independent-power (AIP) as batteries alone are unlikely to be enough.

While 100 feet long may sound small for a submarine, it is massive for an uncrewed boat. If you were to add the crew space back in it’d be around the same size as many navies’ submarines. Most unmanned underwater vehicles are tiny by comparison, less than 15 feet long. The increased size will allow the new craft to carry substantial armament such as torpedoes and mines, or even smaller AUVs.

The first vehicle is expected to be an enlargement of an existing vessel built by MSubs, the Mobile Under Sea Test Laboratory (MUST) design the Royal Navy already uses. But the company offers all-new XLUUV designs including the Moray. This has a sail like a submarine and can perform a wide range of roles such as anti-submarine warfare, mine warfare and attacking surface ships. It also conducts surveillance and intelligence gathering, and can support Special Forces. The exact armed roles that the Royal Navy has in mind are unclear, but the Moray may hint at the direction things are going.

China, South Korea and Japan are known to have large AUVs under development but nothing of the scale of the Royal Navy Project. It remains to be seen how Russia may respond to this trend.




Paddywhackery not included.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2020 at 11:36 AM


British Royal Navy has awarded contract for large autonomous underwater vehicle

Posted On Thursday, 05 March 2020 14:07

The Royal Navy has awarded a contract for a large autonomous underwater vehicle, First Sea Lord Admiral Tony Radakin revealed at the Underwater Defence and Security Conference.


MSubs Ltd underwater vehicle will be twice the length of the Boeing Orca pictured (Picture source: Boeing)

Plymouth-based MSubs Ltd is to provide the senior service with a 30-metre underwater vehicle, which has a range of up to 3,000 nautical miles.

“I am really excited by the possibilities that this offers to increase our reach and lethality, improve our efficiency and reduce the number of people we have to put in harm’s way,” said Adm Radakin.

He went on to tell the Southampton conference that the underwater environment had always been defence’s biggest problem.

“For my entire career we have been talking about oceans becoming transparent,” said Adm Radakin. “And yet they remain opaque. We continually horizon scan, analyse new developments, look at the capabilities that we and our adversaries possess – and there is nothing.

“On the land, in the air, increasingly even at sea, there is nowhere left to hide. But underwater remains impenetrable.

“This is good for us. The Royal Navy has the huge responsibility of delivering the nuclear deterrent on behalf of the nation, and still the cheapest, most secure and most effective means of doing this is by submarine.

“Last year, we celebrated 50 years of continuous at-sea deterrence. That is a remarkable achievement. And I am delighted that this will continue, with the Dreadnought replacement for the Vanguard-class submarines already under construction.

“In 2019 we saw the highest Russian activity in the North Atlantic for over 30 years. Submarines are getting quieter, more capable and harder to detect.”

Adm Radakin said he was happy with the future of the Royal Navy.

“We are growing for the first time in 70 years. And between 2015 and 2025 our tonnage will increase by nearly 30 per cent.

“The world is changing at a startling rate, and technology and innovation are moving faster than they ever have before.

“We need to remain ahead of our adversaries. This is why the Royal Navy is currently undergoing a period of transformation.

“We are focusing on five main areas: increasing our operational advantage in the North Atlantic; becoming a Carrier Strike Navy; increasing our Forward Presence; modernising our Royal Marines into a Future Commando Force, and embracing Technology and Innovation in a much better way. And you will recognise that two of these - the North Atlantic, and Technology and Innovation – are closely linked with the underwater domain.”

Adm Radakin also spoke about defence’s investment in new equipment, including the Dreadnought-class submarines, the Type 26 and 31 frigates, the P8 Poseidon aircraft, upgrades to infrastructure, including a new submarine training school.

“There is a great deal going on here. But I am confident that we are heading in the right direction, pursuing modern solutions, modern ways of working, delivering solutions to traditional problems in a modern way. And we will continue to evolve, both nationally and in company with our allies,” he added.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2020 at 11:40 AM


Wrong illustration Navy Recognition! This is ORCA...………

View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2020 at 12:08 PM


UK Defence Journal

Royal Navy awards contract for large autonomous submarine


By George Allison - March 5, 202051

The Royal Navy has awarded a contract for a large autonomous submarine.

Plymouth-based MSubs Ltd are to provide the Royal Navy with a 30-metre underwater vehicle with a range of up to 3,000 nautical miles.

According to a Royal Navy news release the XLUUV (Extra Large Unmanned Underwater Vehicle), known as Manta, has been designed and built in just 14 months.

A Ministry of Defence statement said:

“An initial £1 million contract has been awarded to Plymouth-based MSubs Ltd to build a test submarine that will be used to explore the potential capabilities of larger uncrewed underwater vehicles in the future. Measuring about 30m in length, this extra-large autonomous submarine is significantly larger than autonomous submarines used for beach reconnaissance, allowing it to operate at a range of 3000 nautical miles.

XLUUV submarines are especially adept at covert intelligence gathering. They can leave their dock autonomously and secretly move to the operational area without any embarked crew for up to three months. They are also able to sense hostile targets and report their findings back to the station, making them an important barrier for anti-submarine warfare.”

For more imagery and specifications, see the MSubs website here.

https://msubs.com/unmanned-submersibles/xluuv/


A concept image of ‘Manta’ via the MSubs website

“I am really excited by the possibilities that this offers to increase our reach and lethality, improve our efficiency and reduce the number of people we have to put in harm’s way,” Admiral Radakin was quoted as saying.

Paddy Dowsett from MSubs said in a news release:

“We are thrilled to be awarded this contract through DASA, and have the opportunity to work with defence scientists and experts to develop new and advanced capabilities for the Royal Navy. This funding will allow the Royal Navy to better understand their future roles and for us to remain at the forefront of Extra Large Uncrewed Underwater Vehicles (XLUUV) design and manufacture in Europe.”

What could the submarine look like?

MSubs say that ‘XLUUV/Manta/S201’ is “a 9 metre, 8.9 tonne vehicle intended for 48hr operation at depths up to 305m”, it is likely however to be modified to fit the 30 metre and 3,000 nautical mile range detailed by the First Sea Lord.


Another concept image of the XLUUV developed by MSubs.

“XLUUV/Manta/S201 is an 8.9 tonne vehicle intended for 48hr operation at depths up to 305m. This project is an example of our rapid prototyping capabilities. From outline specification to launch took just 14 months. Dived performance is maximised by attention to streamlining of the outer hull and by the use of advanced motor technology to directly drive the main propeller.

Surface running is possible with one crew member on deck and hatch closed, at speeds up to 6kn in modest sea states, but the vessel’s primary mode of deployment is by crane-in.”


Another concept image via MSubs Ltd.

What are the next steps?

The first phase of DASA’s Developing the Royal Navy’s Autonomous Underwater Capability programme will see an existing crewed submersible refitted with autonomous control systems, say the Ministry of Defence.

“If initial testing is successful, up to a further £1.5 million is available to further test the new capability.”


Image shows an existing S201 submarine. Image via MSubs.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2020 at 11:14 PM


Steel to be cut on first Type 31 Frigate next year

By George Allison - March 6, 20209

The steel for the first Type 31 Frigate will be cut in 2021 and the vessel will enter service in May 2027.

The Type 31 general purpose frigate programme will provide the UK Government with a fleet of five ships, at an average production cost of £250 million per ship, the vessels are being built in Rosyth.

Kevan Jones, Member of Parliament for Durham, asked via a written Parliamentary Question:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether it is his Department’s policy for the Type 31 to have cut steel for the first time in 2021.”

Jeremy Quin, Minister of State at the Ministry of Defence, responded:

“Yes, on current plans the steel will be cut for the first of the five Type 31 Frigates in 2021.”

The Minister added later:

“The first Type 31 Frigate will be in the water in 2023 and all five ships will be delivered by the end of 2028. The approved in service date for the first Type 31 is May 2027. The dates for Initial Operating Capability and Full Operating Capability have not yet been determined.”

Type 26 will cover the high end tasks and Type 31 will generally cover low end constabulary work.

During a 2016 Defence Select Committee hearing, First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones described the vessel that would become Type 31e as “to be a much less high-end ship. It is still a complex warship, and it is still able to protect and defend and to exert influence around the world, but it is deliberately shaped with lessons from wider industry and off-the-shelf technology to make it more appealing to operate at a slightly lower end of Royal Navy operations.”

IHS Janes described it as a “credible frigate” that will cover “maritime security, maritime counter-terrorism and counter-piracy operations, escort duties, and naval fire support sitting between the high-end capability delivered by the Type 26 and Type 45, and the constabulary-oriented outputs to be delivered by the five planned River-class Batch 2 OPVs.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-3-2020 at 01:25 PM


UK reveals XLUUV award for MSubs

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

06 March 2020


The 9 m S201 XLUUV, also known by the name Manta, is an 8.9 tonne vehicle originally developed for manned operation. Source: MSub

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has disclosed the award of a Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) contract to MSubs for the test of an extra-large unmanned underwater vehicle (XLUUV).

Valued at GBP1 million (USD1.3 million), the 12-month Stage 1 contract was placed in September 2019 but not announced until early March. Plymouth-based MSubs is recertifying and upgrading its existing S201 manned submersible to serve as the XLUUV testbed.

Managed by the MoD's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), the DASA innovation fund provides for the accelerated derisking and demonstration of novel techniques and technologies offering potentially transformational military advantage. DASA's Developing the Royal Navy's Autonomous Underwater Capability programme - run jointly with the RN and Dstl - is intended to enable the service to better understand the future utility of XLUUV vehicles.

Admiral Tony Radakin, Chief of Naval Staff and First Sea Lord, announced the DASA XLUUV contract on 5 March at the Underwater Defence & Security Symposium in Southampton. "I am really excited by the possibilities that this offers to increase our reach and lethality, improve our efficiency, and reduce the number of people we have to put in harm's way," Adm Radakin said.

The 9 m S201 XLUUV, also known by the name Manta, is an 8.9 tonne vehicle originally developed for manned operation. Under Phase 1 of the programme, MSubs will refit S201 with an autonomous control system to enable unmanned operation and perform a short seaworthiness/autonomy test. The vehicle modifications will also facilitate the insertion and test of various technologies and payloads

If initial testing is successful, up to GBP1.5 million Phase 2 funding will be made available to support follow-on test and experimentation activities, lasting up to 24 months, to understand the future utility and concept of operations. It is anticipated that Phase 2 testing will explore the contribution of an XLUUV to anti-submarine warfare barrier operations and to flexible, accurate, and timely covert intelligence gathering.

(347 of 454 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-3-2020 at 01:32 PM


Wildcat weapon wing unveiled

Tim Ripley, London - Jane's Navy International

06 March 2020


Environmental tests of Leonardo’s Weapon Wing system have taken place on the company’s Wildcat helicopter ahead of its fielding by the Royal Navy. Source: Leonardo

For the first time Leonardo has unveiled in public its weapon wing system that is to equip UK AW159 Wildcat HMA2 maritime helicopters during the Royal Navy's (RN's) Carrier Strike Group 2021 (CSG21) deployment.

The UK-arm of the Italian company displayed one of the first production wings during the UK Naval Engineering Science & Technology (UKNEST) engagement activity aboard the second Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales on 2 March as part of its week-long visit to Liverpool.

Speaking to Jane's , Louis Wilson-Chalon, maritime marketing manager at Leonardo Helicopters UK, said the system's aerodynamic design meant each wing created 360 kg of lift, significantly improving the endurance of the helicopter.

The aluminium alloy and carbon fibre composite weapon wings enable a mix of weapons to be carried for a variety of force protection scenarios. This includes a full load of 20 Thales Martlet air-to-surface and up to four MBDA Sea Venom anti-ship missiles, or a mix of two Sea Venoms and 10 Martlets.

Wilson-Chalon said environment trials have been carried out on Wildcats as part of the testing programme under way ahead of the CSG21 deployment to the Middle East and Pacific regions due next year. The tests will culminate in the live firing of weapons.

It is expected that during CSG21, RN Wildcats will operate from Type 23 frigates and Type 45 destroyers rather than be embarked on the carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth itself, as part of the service's layered defence concept.

The Sea Venom is not to formally enter service with the RN until January 2022, so the Wildcat will only be equipped with Martlet missiles and door guns, as well as BAE Stingray anti-submarine torpedoes and Mark 11 depth charges, during CSG21.

(313 of 488 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  21    23  

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 79.4% - SQL: 20.6%]