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Author: Subject: Canadian Navy, 2017 onwards
buglerbilly
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[*] posted on 1-6-2017 at 09:26 AM
Canadian Navy, 2017 onwards


Containerised TRAPS compact ASW sonar set for delivery to RCN

IHS Jane's Navy International

31 May 2017

Key Points

- The containerised TRAPS system is being developed under a BCIP contract
- Delivery to DRDC is scheduled for the third quarter of 2017, with sea trials to follow from an MCDV

Canadian marine acoustics house GeoSpectrum Technologies is to deliver a containerised lightweight low frequency active/passive variable depth sonar to Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) later this year for trials with the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN).

Known as the Towed Reelable Active Passive Sonar (TRAPS), the new anti-submarine warfare (ASW) sonar system is being developed under a Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP) contract placed in October 2016.

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[*] posted on 6-6-2017 at 10:58 PM


Canadian Surface Combatant bid deadline extended again

David Carl, Toronto - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

06 June 2017

Another extension has been given to bidders on the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) programme, Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) announced on 5 June, citing a need to answer questions from bidding companies as the extension's cause.

The CSC's request for proposals was issued in October 2016, with an original submission deadline of 27 April. On 16 February, PSPC announced that the deadline would be moved to 22 June. This new extension will give bidding companies until mid-August to submit bids.

Draft bids can be submitted for review until 15 June. Bids submitted for draft review will not be scored, but bidders will be made aware if their submissions are non-compliant in any way.

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[*] posted on 1-9-2017 at 03:30 PM


Interim AOR Unveiled at Ceremony in Quebec

(Source: Royal Canadian Navy; issued Aug 30, 2017)


Vice-Admiral Ron Lloyd, left, and Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Michel Vigneault were on hand for the unveiling of the converted MV Asterix. (RCN photo)

The Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) interim Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment ship was unveiled to the public in its nearly-completed state during an open house at Davie Shipbuilding’s Quebec shipyard on July 21, 2017.

Vice-Admiral Ron Lloyd, Commander RCN, was at the unveiling, along with a number of representatives from industry and the federal government. He said it was a privilege for both himself and RCN Chief Petty Officer, Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Michel Vigneault, to be some of the first people to see the converted container ship in its new, freshly painted state.

MV Asterix, as it will remain known during its service to the navy, has been dubbed the first Resolve-class naval support ship by Davie Shipbuilding. In a news release the shipbuilder said Asterix will provide “a wide range of functions from at-sea replenishment of fuels and cargo to aviation support, fleet medical support and humanitarian and disaster relief” to the RCN.

The ship is intended to fill the navy’s replenishment-at-sea capability gap as it awaits the construction and arrival of the Queenston-class Joint Support Ships. The federal government has agreed to lease the ship for a five-year period, with a crew of Canadian Armed Forces specialists serving alongside civilian mariners and a civilian master employed by Davie sister company Federal Fleet Services.

The ship is expected in Halifax this fall to begin trials, and is set to be in service supporting the Atlantic or Pacific fleet by early next year.

The unveiling event included the traditional breaking of a champagne bottle on the bow by the sponsor of the ship in order to bless the ship and its crew, which was performed by Pauline Théberge, spouse of J. Michel Doyon, the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec.

Davie Shipbuilding Chairman Alex Vicefield said the day was a celebration of what the company’s team of shipbuilders has achieved in a short time frame. Work on the conversion began in May of last year.

“The delivery of this ship will restore Canada’s ability to form a naval task group. What a great way to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary,” he said.

(ends)

Backgrounder: Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment Capability

(Source: Royal Canadian Navy; issued Aug 30, 2017)

Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment vessels are a critical component of any true “Blue Water” navy. They are an at-sea replenishment (logistic support) capability that enables a ship or a task group of ships to operate autonomously for extended periods of time in both home and foreign waters.

The RCN is in the midst of the most comprehensive period of fleet modernization in its peacetime history. It is a program of renewal that both touches upon, and goes beyond all current elements of Canada’s naval force. While a number of its current ships are being modernized, and until new classes of ships come on line, the RCN’s at-sea supply requirements will be met through a creative blend of MLSAs, smart scheduling and an interim AOR. Eventually, the fleet’s capability will be augmented by the new, Queenston-class Joint Support Ships.

The Current Capability - Mutual Logistics Support Arrangements with Allies

Mutual Logistics Support Arrangements (MLSAs) are highly flexible Memorandums of Understanding designed to facilitate the provision of logistics, supplies and services. A MLSA is part of the larger process of cooperation between Canadian and allied defence forces. They are very detailed cooperative agreements between navies that should not be confused with a leasing arrangement.

Furthermore, the training that is conducted through MLSAs is vital to maintaining the individual skills and core seamanship abilities within the Canadian Fleet that are essential to deployed operations, and necessary for retaining the expertise that will eventually be required to operate Canada’s future Queenston-class Joint Support Ships.

The RCN’s first MLSA was signed with the Chilean Navy (Armada de Chile) for the use of one of its replenishment ships, AO-52 Almirante Montt, for a dedicated period of 40 sea days in Canada’s Pacific region. This arrangement lasted from early July to late August 2015.

The RCN recently completed an agreement with the Spanish Navy for the use of one of its replenishment ships, SPS Patiño for a period of 40 days in Canada’s Atlantic region. This arrangement took place over the months of February and March of 2016.

MLSAs with partner nations, along with smart scheduling, and the upcoming provision of an Interim AOR capability through Project Resolve Inc., endeavour to provide limited relief to the AOR capability gap the RCN is currently experiencing.

Interim Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment Capability

On November 30, 2015, the Government of Canada announced the signing of a contract with Project Resolve Inc. to develop an interim AOR capability.

This contract entails the conversion of a commercial container ship (MV Asterix) into an AOR ship, the provision of the ship’s crew, its overall operational management, and all maintenance. This interim solution will be used to provide at-sea replenishment services to the RCN in non-threat environments.

Project Resolve Inc. has been contracted to provide this at-sea service by fall 2017. The initial period of service delivery will be five years, with options to extend that period by up to five additional one-year terms. The exercise of the options will be at Canada’s sole discretion.

The interim AOR capability will help bridge the gap until the second Queenston-class Joint Support Ship joins RCN fleet operations in late 2021. Its introduction will allow the RCN’s Halifax-class frigates to continue to operate for extended periods away from home port, without relying on foreign ships or port visits for frequently required support and resupply.

The future - Queenston-class Joint Support Ships

The Government of Canada is committed to building the Queenston-class Joint Support Ships (JSS) under the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS).

The JSS will increase the range and endurance of Naval Task Groups by allowing them to stay at sea for long periods without having to return to port for resupply and refuelling. The JSS will supply deployed Naval Task Groups with fuel, ammunition, spare parts, food and water. They will also provide an at-sea platform for the maintenance and the operation of helicopters, a limited sealift capability, as well as the ability to support to operations ashore when needed.

The JSS will be capable of operating across a full spectrum of threat environments. They will house a robust warfighting capability, and be operated by military personnel. The JSS are a critical component for achieving success in both international and domestic CAF missions, with the ships constituting a vital and strategic national asset.

Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards will be responsible for the construction of both JSS at its shipyard in North Vancouver, British Columbia. The first JSS, to be named Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Queenston, is scheduled for delivery in 2020. HMCS Queenston is expected to be operational in late 2020 with the second ship, HMCS Châteauguay, to be delivered a year later and operational in late 2021.

Retirement of HMCS Protecteur and HMCS Preserver

On 19 September 2014, Vice-Admiral Mark Norman, Commander of the RCN, announced the retirement of the Navy’s legacy refueling fleet. HMCS Protecteur was formally paid off on May 14, 2015, and HMCS Preserver was formally paid off on October 21, 2016.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 2-9-2017 at 09:01 AM


So the 'projected' cost is CAD $430 million for a 26,000t converted container ship.

Norway is purchasing a smaller variant of the British Tide class (also 26,000t), albeit with an enchanced Hospital and greater dry-store capacity for CAD $236 million.

The Brits are getting all four Tides for CAD $763 million (37,000t), although that doesn't include 'Military' equipment such as Comms, Weapons and some of the RAS gear.

Hardly the best use of scarce funding




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[*] posted on 2-9-2017 at 11:18 AM


They could have done the same as the Brits, same hull, just a fifth version, and then outfitted it the same way, and still saved CDN$200 Million or so, OR copied the Norwegians................STILL a clusterfuck of a Defence Procurement system made no better by Pierre`s little left-wing hunny bunny................
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[*] posted on 3-9-2017 at 05:39 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
They could have done the same as the Brits, same hull, just a fifth version, and then outfitted it the same way, and still saved CDN$200 Million or so, OR copied the Norwegians................STILL a clusterfuck of a Defence Procurement system made no better by Pierre`s little left-wing hunny bunny................

As a member of the ADF the existence of the Canadian and the Indian procurement process always makes me feel a bit better about how we do things.
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[*] posted on 3-9-2017 at 06:14 PM


Quote: Originally posted by JimWH  
As a member of the ADF the existence of the Canadian and the Indian procurement process always makes me feel a bit better about how we do things.


It always pays to set high standards...




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[*] posted on 5-9-2017 at 10:04 AM


Y'know, we find out about these massive cluster-fraks because India, Canada, the UK, US and Australia all are functional democracies with active and politically free media sectors.

Given that it makes me wonder on the scale of the procurement fiasco's in China and Russia that must happen but we never hear about.

Functional dictatorships and kleptocracies aren't exactly the best at delivering complex defence projects on time and on budget.




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[*] posted on 5-9-2017 at 02:13 PM


You only have to look at the HUGE time differences and durations the Russians take for anything other than Corvettes and Light Frigates...................I'd love to know the Chinese vessels quality standards? Most likely ignored in the rush to get as many hulls in the water as possible......................
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[*] posted on 17-10-2017 at 09:48 PM


Published: Monday, 16 October 2017 17:07

Interim Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment AOR Ship Launched for Royal Canadian Navy

The comment about being "internationally competitive cost" I treat with derision, having been involved with 4 or 5 projects looking at converting existing (and relatively new) ships to FPSO's and LNG Tankers, etc., conversions are uniformly MORE expensive than new builds, without exception............!

Davie Shipbuilding today announced that during the weekend it launched the largest naval vessel ever to be delivered from a Canadian shipyard – on time, to budget and at an internationally competitive cost.

  
MV Asterix launched in the water. Davie Shipbuilding picture.
 
Commissioning of all onboard systems began in early September and on the 16th November 2017, the ship will perform its sea-trials prior to achieving Full Operational Capability (FOC). During the sea-trials – overseen by Lloyds Register – the ship’s safety, quality, systems and functionality will be tested against the high military standards and specifications which it has been built to.

The build quality and modern design of this ship, with the latest Canadian naval systems, is testament not only to Davie’s experience, infrastructure and unparalleled expertise but also to the incredible contribution by the hundreds of Canadian suppliers involved. Over 900 Canadian companies have contributed to the build of the ship, including the supply of key military-specified equipment such as its Integrated Navigational and Tactical System (INTS), its NATO-compliant Replenishment-At-Sea (RAS) systems and its naval Integrated Platform Management System (IPMS).

 
Civilian container vessel M.V. Asterix was converted into an Auxiliary Oil Replenishment (AOR) ship for the Royal Canadian Navy’s interim supply ship capability. Picture: Chantier Davie
 
Alex Vicefield, Chairman of Davie Shipbuilding, commented, “The delivery of this ship has clearly demonstrated that there is a Canadian shipyard capable of delivering complex naval platforms on time, to budget and at internationally competitive prices. In the knowledge that the Royal Canadian Navy needed this ship urgently, our 1,400 staff have worked day and night to ensure that it is not only delivered on time but that it is of a quality that will be able to serve Canada proudly for decades to come. The success of this multi-functional design, which is equally suited to both combat and humanitarian operations, has generated worldwide interest from foreign navies.”

Spencer Fraser, CEO of Federal Fleet Services, added, “Our Canadian crew are all onboard and are ready to begin operations alongside the Royal Canadian Navy. We have prepared for this moment for two years and we will very soon be ready to support Canadian Forces in any theater of operations, worldwide, at a minute’s notice.”

  
MV Asterix launched in the water. Davie Shipbuilding picture.
 
The ship was laid down on 21 October 2008 at the Nordic Yards Wismar in Wismar, Germany. The ship was launched as Cynthia on 27 January 2009 and work was completed on the vessel on 1 May 2010.

The vessel has a full load displacement of 26,000 tonnes with a legnth of 182.5 meters and a beam of 25.2 meters. It is fitted with a Phalanx CIWS, L3 MAPSS integrated platform management system (IPMS) and large landing deck capable of handling the largest helicopters, including the CH-147F Chinook.

Asterix will be used for at sea fuel replenishing for both liquid and solids using NATO-standardised methods and two cranes for loading and unloading purposes. The ship will be able to deliver 400 tons of fresh water per day and carry 7,000 tons of fuel oil and 980 tons of JP8 Jet fuel.

The Resolve-Class Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment ship will play a key role in the Royal Canadian Navy's HADR efforts.The specific HADR capabilities include:

- A humanitarian processing area for triage and care of evacuees/survivors
- A large medical facility for up to 60 patients in two separate wards
- Emergency accommodation for up to 350 people (in addition to the ship's current 150 persons capacity)
- A ship-shore airlift capability via the two embarked Cyclone CH-148 helicopters
- A significant small craft capability that includes up to 8 boats with quick launch and recovery capabilities
- The ability to sustain the delivery over 400t/day of Fresh Water and up to 7000t of Fuel Oil, as well as significant power
- The transportation and self-sufficient loading and unloading of light vehicles, sea containers and general cargo that are essential for HADR missions.
  
Computer rendering of the vessel after conversion. Picture: Chantier Davie
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[*] posted on 29-11-2017 at 11:01 AM


Published: Tuesday, 28 November 2017 16:24

Lockheed Martin Details its Canadian Surface Combatant Proposal
 
Two days prior to the procurement closure date, Lockheed Martin Canada has confirmed delivery of the proposal for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) program signifying that the acquisition has moved to the next critical phase.
 
 
Lockheed Martin Canada CSC proposal is based on the Type 26 Global Combat Ship by BAE Systems.
  
BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA and Ultra Electronics are partnering as Canada's Combat Ship Team for the Royal Canadian Navy's future fleet of surface combatants. Canada's Combat Ship Team is offering the most advanced and modern warship design, the Type 26 Global Combat Ship (GCS), with high-tech platform innovations from prominent Canadian companies. The solution includes the internationally renowned Canadian-developed combat management system, CMS 330.

Canada's Combat Ship Team's approach to the CSC project exclusively parallels the Canadian Government's Defence Policy, which is the foundation for the offering: Strong, Secure and Engaged.

STRONG. Canada's Combat Ship Team's approach to the strategic objective STRONG is to provide the right ship for the Royal Canadian Navy that surpasses baseline requirements with minimal change. This solution represents the lowest development risk and is underpinned by Canadian doctrine; interoperability with five-eyes nations and other NATO allies; ability to achieve safety certification and security accreditation; ease of operation, maintenance and sustainment; and ease of upgradeability to address future capabilities.

SECURE. Under the pillar of SECURE, Canada's Combat Ship Team's offering focuses on ensuring successful program execution by bringing together a pan-Canadian team who have proven, demonstrated and current pedigree in performing complex defence contracts in Canada; who have well-established infrastructure, employees, security clearances and facilities in place today; who have demonstrated their commitment and reliability to successfully execute the project by their substantial investments in CSC and in meeting all procurement deadlines; and therefore who are poised to perform the CSC program, Ready on Day One.

ENGAGED. Embodied throughout Canada's Combat Ship Team's offering is our multifaceted approach to achieving the strategic pillar ENGAGED. The underlying principles implemented focus on partnership with all stakeholders and, equally important, maintaining sovereignty of the CSC solution in Canada, which can only be achieved by having the solution and capability developed "at home" by Canadians.

Canada's Combat Ship Team is living proof that capability investments made in Canada result in sustained jobs not only through long term sustainment of its system and products, but also extend to exports which leverage Canada's investments to other nations adding more jobs to Canadian industry. This team recognizes the significant benefits that Canada will receive with the implementation of Canada's Combat Ship Team's strategic objective to bring the jobs "home" to Canada and therefore collectively become the Home Team.
 
BAE Systems video: https://youtu.be/vgdGXzVHgZ0
  
"The Type 26 Global Combat Ship is a flexible, next generation warship design which offers a low risk and affordable solution for the Canadian Surface Combatant program. With the UK Type 26 program running ahead of CSC, our Canadian ship will benefit from lessons learnt on the UK program. This schedule also allows Type 26 the opportunity to be the most advanced Canadian Surface Combatant.

Canadian companies such as W.R. Davis Engineering in Ottawa, Rolls-Royce in Peterborough and L3 MAPPS in Montréal have already begun work on delivering high-technology systems for the UK's Type 26, demonstrating the skills and capability available from the Canadian supply chain." Anne Healey, Country Director, Canada, BAE Systems

"Building on our proud Canadian history of more than 70 years, we are honoured to join forces with this pan-Canadian team that has been assembled for CSC. CAE welcomes the opportunity to leverage the strengths of our combined organizations to support the Government of Canada and Irving Shipbuilding to deliver a modern, capable warship with an integrated training system that aligns with the Future Naval Training Strategy. CAE is dedicated to offering customers the most innovative training solutions to achieve the highest levels of operational readiness and performance." Joe Armstrong, Vice President and General Manager - Canada, CAE

"The Defence Policy released earlier this year announced the Government's new vision for the Canadian Armed Forces, and as a Pan-Canadian team, our approach to CSC implements these Defence Policy pillars where we are offering the right ship for the Navy to enable them to be STRONG; we are offering proven, Canadian pedigree of companies to ensure successful program execution is SECURE; and we are offering a solution that ensures sovereignty is maintained by bringing the direct jobs on CSC home to Canada so that we are ENGAGED and able to sustain the CSC ships throughout their lifespan.

Lockheed Martin Canada has been Canada's trusted Combat System Integrator for more than three decades, and our team can be counted on to deliver affordable solutions, sustained job creation, and technology development in Canada for export potential. We'll employ our proven collaborative partnership model to successfully manage the highly complex systems integration process – including integrating our CMS 330 Combat Management System with the Type 26 Global Combat Ship – and leverage the innovation and talent here at home which will ultimately result in unprecedented economic outcome for Canada." Rosemary Chapdelaine, Vice President and General Manager, Lockheed Martin Canada Rotary and Mission Systems

"We are proud to be a member of Canada's Combat Ship Team. With a strong Canadian footprint, we are in a unique position to leverage our established Canadian companies to deliver Canadian marine technologies, systems integration support, and through life in service support to the team in a number of areas including integrated communications, electro optic and infrared sensors, torpedo handling systems, and integrated platform management systems." Mike Greenley, President, L3 WESCAM

"As one of Canada's leading space and defence companies, MDA's participation in this team is very strategic. For MDA, in addition to providing world-class operational CSC capability to the Canadian Forces, this project will be a major enabler in achieving significant future MDA exports from Canada and the resulting growth in jobs and business in Canada – a continuous corporate strategy for MDA since 1969." Dave Hargreaves, Vice President – Aerospace and Defence, Surveillance and Intelligence, MDA

"As a long-time participant in Canada's defence community, Ultra Electronics is delighted to be a member of Canada's Combat Ship Team. It is truly a privilege to be able to provide our world-leading Canadian designed and developed underwater warfare products to this uniquely assembled team to deliver Canada's future surface combatant." Ken Walker, President, Ultra Electronics Canada
 
 
 
Quick Facts

In June 2016, following Industry engagement, the Government of Canada announced that it would proceed with a procurement package based on a Total Ship Reference Point. For industry, this meant combining the efforts of a warship designer and combat systems integrator into a consolidated proposal.

BAE's Type 26 has been selected by the Royal Navy and steel has been cut on the first of a planned eight ships. Due to its current stage in the lifecycle, there is no obsolescence in the design and it therefore offers the lowest risk to build in Canada.

The Type 26 Global Combat Ship can undertake a wide range of roles from high intensity conflict to humanitarian assistance, including anti-submarine warfare and air defence. It is flexible, versatile and highly survivable with an extremely low acoustic signature.

Built for the Royal Canadian Navy's doctrine, tactics and operations, Lockheed Martin Canada's innovative Combat Management System – CMS 330 – was developed in Canada as a result of 34 years' experience and knowledge of Canadian and NATO naval operations.

Members of Canada's Combat Ship Team are currently delivering on the final stages of Canada's HALIFAX-class Modernization Project.

Collectively, our team employs more than 9,000 Canadians in over 40 facilities across the country with an established presence on both coasts. Our collective Canadian supply chain consists of approximately 4,000 contracts Canada-wide.
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[*] posted on 2-12-2017 at 10:00 AM


Canadian Surface Combatant bids compete on technology transfer, job creation

Andrew MacDonald - Jane's Defence Weekly

01 December 2017

Lockheed Martin and Alion Canada’s bids for the Canadian Surface Combatant programme have been followed on 30 November and 1 December by offerings from Navantia and Naval Group and Fincantieri, respectively, with all participants offering significant engagement with Canadian industry.

Lockheed Martin Canada’s proposal, based around BAE Systems’ Type 26 Global Combat Ship and including involvement from a ‘pan-Canadian team’ including CAE, L3 Technologies, MDA, and Ultra Electronics Maritime Systems, focuses on sustained job creation and development of technology domestically in Canada, with potential export opportunities.

Alion Canada, which has teamed with Damen Shipbuilding, Atlas Elektronik, and Hensoldt, is offering a design based on the Royal Netherlands Navy’s air defence and command frigate (Luchtverdedigings- en commandofregat: LCF).

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[*] posted on 2-12-2017 at 10:41 AM


Naval Group, Fincantieri join forces in Canada warship tender

By: Pierre Tran and Tom Kington   6 hours ago


Canada has declared its intention to acquire 15 surface combatant ships. Naval Group and Fincantieri proposed a joint offer based on the FREMM. (Naval Group)

PARIS and ROME — Naval Group and Italian partner Fincantieri have filed a joint bid based on the FREMM multimission frigate in the Canadian tender for 15 warships, a spokesman for the French shipbuilder said Friday.

“We submitted our offer yesterday,” the Naval Group spokesman told Defense News.

The joint offer has “strong support” of the French and Italian governments, the two companies said in a Dec. 1 joint statement.

That bid benefits from the FREMM frigate being sea-proven, interoperable by NATO standards and available off the shelf, all of which cuts stress on the Canadian budget, the spokesman said.

Announcement of that offer marks a turnaround for Fincantieri, which previously objected to the way the tender was set up. The Italian company was unhappy with the Canadian request that a large amount of technical data about the frigate be handed over to the prime contractor, Irving Shipbuilding, before a winner is chosen.

The statement on their joint bid, however, contains a carefully worded paragraph stating that “transfer of technology” would go ahead “should the offer be accepted.”

The declaration of interest hinged on technology transfer in the event of victory, a Fincantieri spokesman said.

“It was unusual that the transfer of a large amount of technical data to a private company was requested at the start of the procurement procedure, before winning,” he said.

“Should the offer be accepted, the future frigates would be built in Canada at Irving Shipbuilding in a very short time, maximizing Canadian industrial participation and job creation locally through a dedicated and comprehensive transfer of technology, as well as integrating Canadian suppliers into the two companies’ global supply chains,” the two companies said in the statement.

The international competition for the Canadian Surface Combatant has sparked close interest and is seen as a test of European industrial consolidation. France and Italy are in negotiations for closer ties between Fincantieri and Naval Group, in an attempt to increase cross-border cooperation.

The two companies and government officials are in talks for a cross-shareholding of 10 percent in the partner firms and creation of a joint venture to pursue export contracts for warships. A deal is expected to be reached next year.

Naval Group and Fincantieri jointly designed and developed the FREMM frigate, which sails with the French and Italian navies.

Prior to the FREMM, the two firms worked together on the Horizon, an air-defense frigate with a higher level of common equipment than the former.
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[*] posted on 2-12-2017 at 12:34 PM


Navantia Team Submits Proposal for CSC

(Source: Navantia; issued Nov 30, 2017)


Navantia's SEA5000 proposal is based on the Hobart class Air Warfare Destroyer design. The CSC proposal is likely to be very similar, with the CEA radar.

“We are pleased to announce that Navantia-led team has submitted its tender response for the Canadian Surface Combatant program, with Saab Australia as the Combat Systems Integrator (CSI) and CEA Technologies providing key elements of the proposed solution. With a strong heritage in designing and building frigates and destroyers and proven technology transfer in global programs, the Navantia team offers a compliant solution with the best capability for the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian shipbuilding industry,” said Navantia Chairman Esteban García Vilasánchez.

The team’s proposal is focused on delivering an operationally proven design and leveraging the capabilities key Canadian companies to deliver a ship that is ideally suited to Canada’s requirement. A solution based on the proven F-105 frigate design for the Spanish Navy has been proposed. Navantia has a proud history of delivering for partner navies around the world variants of this design that are currently in service for Norwegian Navy and, most recently, the destroyer HMAS Hobart to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

This modern Anti-Submarine Warfare ship will incorporate Saab's globally recognised 9LV Combat Management Systems (CMS), elements of which are in service on over 240 platforms in 16 navies across the globe, including Canada’s own Halifax class frigates. Demonstrating the proven capabilities Saab Australia and the 9LVCMS it was recently mandated by the Australian Government for use on all major surface combatants of the Royal Australian Navy.

“Our expertise in developing high quality solutions for Australian programs in partnership with CEA Technologies, Navantia and others allows us to provide a low-risk, high capability solution for Canada, which will be fully interoperable with partner navies. The confidence of the Australian Government in mandating Saab combat systems and tactical interfaces across the whole RAN fleet demonstrates the strength of our capability and we look forward to continuing to work with the Royal Australian and Royal Canadian Navies to continue to develop our world-leading systems”

The submission of the CSC bid is also a significant moment for CEA Technologies, providing further opportunities for global partnership, and recognition of the radar expertise the company has built.

“We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with Canada in the CSC program,” said CEA Technologies CEO Merv Davis.

“We can deliver a mature radar which is outperforming the expectations of the Royal Australian Navy and has substantial potential for future growth. Building partnerships through international programs such as CSC is an opportunity for CEA to continue to demonstrate the performance of our innovative solutions. We are proud to be able to provide our Australian technologies to our international partners and allies”

Other key suppliers engaged by Saab to support the CSC program include Lockheed Martin (Moorestown, New Jersey), General Dynamic Mission Systems – Canada (GDMS-C), DRS Technologies Limited Canada (DRS TCL), OSI Maritime Service and Rheinmetall Canada.

Our solution will utilise and develop the unique capabilities of over fifty Canadian companies and will create over one thousand long-term, high tech jobs in Canada. Our proposal includes a full technology transfer of Navantia's design and Saab's 9LV CMS to Canada to be integrated and maintained by Canadian companies”

The F-105 is far beyond the conceptual stage of a slowly evolving design process, and is marketed based on proven operational performance as opposed to claims of wishful thinking. Selection of the Navantia solution will ensure Canada is not burdened with unnecessary cost and risk concerns as CSC transitions from design, to production and ultimately, to a proven operational capability.

An exciting opportunity, the Navantia team looks forward to having the opportunity to work with Canada in developing and delivering the full capability of the Canadian Surface Combatant to the Royal Canadian Navy”

Under the CSC program, the Royal Canadian Navy will acquire up to 15 frigates to replace the Iroquois Class destroyers and Halifax Class frigates. Construction of the frigates will begin in the early 2020s.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 10:10 AM


If Navantia is selected it will be interesting to see how much Canada ends up paying for the same frigates we will be likely building.

Who knows, they might actually make ASC look efficient.




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[*] posted on 4-12-2017 at 06:51 PM


More on this Navantia bid............

Published: Friday, 01 December 2017 08:34

Navantia team submits its proposal for CSC Frigate programme
 
Navantia team has announced the submission of its proposal for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) program.

“We are pleased to announce that Navantia-led team has submitted its tender response for the Canadian Surface Combatant program, with Saab Australia as the Combat Systems Integrator (CSI) and CEA Technologies providing key elements of the proposed solution. With a strong heritage in designing and building frigates and destroyers and proven technology transfer in global programs, the Navantia team offers a compliant solution with the best capability for the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian shipbuilding industry”, said Navantia Chairman Esteban García Vilasánchez.

  
The frigate design submited by Navantia for CSC is fitted with a 127mm main gun by Leonardo, a CEAFAR2 radar by CEA, 2x RAM launchers by Raytheon, 2x 35mm Millenium CIWS guns by Rheinmetall, 48x VLS and 8x RBS-15 Mk3 anti-ship missiles by Saab.
 
The team’s proposal is focused on delivering an operationally proven design and leveraging the capabilities key Canadian companies to deliver a ship that is ideally suited to Canada’s requirement. A solution based on the proven F-105 frigate design for the Spanish Navy has been proposed.Navantia has a proud history of delivering for partner navies around the worldvariants of this design that are currently in service for Norwegian Navy and, most recently, the destroyer HMAS Hobart to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

This modern Anti-Submarine Warfare ship will incorporate Saab's globally recognised 9LV Combat Management Systems (CMS), elements of which are in service on over 240 platforms in 16 navies across the globe, including Canada’s own Halifax class frigates.Demonstrating the proven capabilities Saab Australia and the 9LVCMS it was recently mandated by the Australian Government for use on all major surface combatants of the Royal Australian Navy.

“Our expertise in developing high quality solutions for Australian programs in partnership with CEA Technologies, Navantia and others allows us to provide a low-risk, high capability solution for Canada, which will be fully interoperable with partner navies. The confidence of the Australian Government in mandating Saab combat systems and tactical interfaces across the whole RAN fleet demonstrates the strength of our capability and we look forward to continuing to work with the Royal Australian and Royal Canadian Navies to continue to develop our world-leading systems.”

The submission of the CSC bid is also a significant moment for CEA Technologies, providing further opportunities for global partnership, and recognition of the radar expertise the company has built.“

“We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with Canada in the CSC program,” said CEA Technologies CEO Merv Davis.

“We can deliver a mature radar which is outperforming the expectations of the Royal Australian Navy and has substantial potential for future growth. Building partnerships through international programs such as CSC is an opportunity for CEA to continue to demonstrate the performance of our innovative solutions. We are proud to be able to provide our Australian technologies to our international partners and allies.”

Other key suppliers engaged by Saab to support the CSC program include Lockheed Martin (Moorestown, New Jersey), General Dynamic Mission Systems – Canada (GDMS-C), DRS Technologies Limited Canada (DRSTCL), OSI Maritime Service and Rheinmetall Canada.

"Our solution will utilise and develop the unique capabilities of over fifty Canadian companies and will create over one thousand long-term, high tech jobs in Canada. Our proposal includes a full technology transfer of Navantia's design and Saab's 9LV CMSto Canada to be integrated and maintained by Canadian companies.”

The F-105 is far beyond the conceptual stage of a slowly evolving design process, and is marketed based on proven operational performance as opposed to claims of wishful thinking. Selection of the Navantia solution will ensure Canada is not burdened with unnecessary cost and risk concerns as CSC transitions from design, to production and ultimately, to a proven operational capability.

"An exciting opportunity, the Navantia team looks forward to having the opportunity to work with Canada in developing and delivering the full capability of the Canadian Surface Combatant to the Royal Canadian Navy.”

Under the CSC program, the Royal Canadian Navy will acquire up to 15 frigates to replace the Iroquois Class destroyers and Halifax Class frigates. Construction of the frigates will begin in the early 2020s.
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[*] posted on 5-12-2017 at 12:52 PM


European firms jointly offer frigate to Canadian government, skipping shipbuilder

By: Pierre Tran   4 hours ago


Canada has declared its intention to acquire 15 surface combatant ships. Naval Group and Fincantieri proposed a joint offer based on the FREMM. (Naval Group)

PARIS — Franco-Italian partners Naval Group and Fincantieri filed their joint offer in a frigate tender directly to Canada‘s defense ministry, rather than submitting the bid to prime contractor Irving Shipbuilding, a spokesman for the French company said Monday.

“The bid was outside the competition procedure, it was a spontaneous offer,” the spokesman told Defense News. The competition rules called for offers to be submitted to Irving.

The two companies submitted their Nov. 30 offer of the FREMM multimission frigate to the ministry, part of a strategy to protect intellectual property rights on the technology, the spokesman said.

That unusual approach included an offer of fast delivery, with the first ship handed over in fall 2019 if the joint bid were accepted next year, the spokesman said.

Fincantieri and Naval Group have offered a fixed price of CAD$30 billion (U.S. $24 billion) for the 15 vessels in the Canadian Surface Combatant program, compared to CAN$62 billion estimated by the Canadian Parliamentary Budget Officer, National Post reported.

That direct offer to the government was the two European companies’ attempt to overcome a perceived preference by Irving for BAE Systems’ offer of the Type 26 frigate, business website La Tribune reported.

BAE has partnered with Lockheed Martin for an offer of the Type 26, which is being built for the British Navy.

The concerns over intellectual property protection stem from the competition rules requiring bidders to submit sensitive information on technology to Irving, which draws heavily on American and British advisers, La Tribune reported.
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[*] posted on 6-12-2017 at 09:11 PM


Published: Wednesday, 06 December 2017 10:49

Davie Shipbuilding Delivered Interim AOR M/V Asterix to Royal Canadian Navy
 
Davie Shipbuilding delivered the M/V Asterix on December 1st 2017. A post on Chantier Davie's facebook page reads: A big thank you and well done to the expert shipbuilders at Davie who have delivered Canada’s next naval support ship (Asterix) in less than 2 years, on time and to budget. M/V Asterix is a former containership which arrived at Chantier Davie’s shipyard in Lévis for conversion into an Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment (AOR) ship in October 2015. M/V Asterix is set to enter into service with the Royal Canadian Navy by the end of this year.

  
M/V Asterix was delivered on time and to budget. Davie Shipbuilding picture.
 
The ship was laid down on 21 October 2008 at the Nordic Yards Wismar in Wismar, Germany. The ship was launched as Cynthia on 27 January 2009 and work was completed on the vessel on 1 May 2010. Conversion started in October 2015 and Davie Shipbuilding launched the vessel converted as AOR in October this year.

The vessel has a full load displacement of 26,000 tonnes with a legnth of 182.5 meters and a beam of 25.2 meters. It is fitted with a Phalanx CIWS, L3 MAPSS integrated platform management system (IPMS) and large landing deck capable of handling the largest helicopters, including the CH-147F Chinook.

Asterix will be used for at sea fuel replenishing for both liquid and solids using NATO-standardised methods and two cranes for loading and unloading purposes. The ship will be able to deliver 400 tons of fresh water per day and carry 7,000 tons of fuel oil and 980 tons of JP8 Jet fuel.
 
 
Civilian container vessel M.V. Asterix was converted into an Auxiliary Oil Replenishment (AOR) ship for the Royal Canadian Navy’s interim supply ship capability. Picture: Chantier Davie
  
The Resolve-Class Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment ship will play a key role in the Royal Canadian Navy's HADR efforts.The specific HADR capabilities include:
- A humanitarian processing area for triage and care of evacuees/survivors
- A large medical facility for up to 60 patients in two separate wards
- Emergency accommodation for up to 350 people (in addition to the ship's current 150 persons capacity)
- A ship-shore airlift capability via the two embarked Cyclone CH-148 helicopters
- A significant small craft capability that includes up to 8 boats with quick launch and recovery capabilities
- The ability to sustain the delivery over 400t/day of Fresh Water and up to 7000t of Fuel Oil, as well as significant power
- The transportation and self-sufficient loading and unloading of light vehicles, sea containers and general cargo that are essential for HADR missions.



Asterix’s unique and innovative two Intermodal Logistics Areas. Picture: Chantier Davie
  
Asterix’s unique and innovative two Intermodal Logistics Areas are a first for a naval support ship, housing fully-accessible, standard ISO twenty-foot containers or equivalently sized units (flat-beds, power generators, water desalination units, mexeflotes etc.)

It allows everything from refrigerated food supplies to ammunition (IMO IMDG Class 1) to be loaded rapidly in port and stored in safe and controlled (ventilated / heated / air conditioned / refrigerated / frozen) environments.

Containers can be accessed and unpacked at sea at each container-deck level, which is served by a cargo elevator providing access to the main deck, tweendeck and helicopter deck for at-sea, in-port and vertical replenishment.

With the Resolve-Class Naval Support Ship, we are bringing naval logistics into the 21st century.

  
Onboard Asterix... Here is what a 21st century RAS control room looks like.
Designed and built in Canada by Hepburn Engineering of Toronto to the latest NATO standards.. Picture: Chantier Davie

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[*] posted on 7-12-2017 at 12:11 PM


Canadian government rejects FREMM bid for new surface combatant

Ian Keddie - Jane's Defence Weekly

06 December 2017

More to follow on this.........

A last-minute offer to build the Royal Canadian Navy’s future Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) warship has been rejected by Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC).

A combined Fincantieri and Naval Group submission offered a fixed-price of CAD30 billion to build 15 Frégates Européennes Multi-Missions (FREMM) frigates in a surprise announcement made on 30 November, the deadline for the request for proposals (RFPs).

The FREMM proposal was dismissed in a programme update released by PSPC on 5 December. PSPC said all bids for the CSC were expected to fall within established bid and evaluation process guidelines, and suggested the FREMM bid did not meet those guidelines.

(105 of 222 words)
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[*] posted on 7-12-2017 at 12:27 PM


Bold move backfires as Canada declines Naval Group-Fincantieri frigate offering

By: Pierre Tran , Tom Kington , and David Pugliese   5 hours ago

PARIS, ROME, and VICTORIA, British Columbia — Naval Group and Fincantieri are out of the running to compete in Canada’s program to acquire a fleet of new surface combatants after they failed to submit a bid through the formal process and instead sent a proposal directly to the Canadian government.

The companies had offered Canada a proposal to construct 15 ships at Irving Shipbuilding in Nova Scotia for a fixed cost. But the proposal circumvented the government’s procurement procedure, which required formal bids to be submitted to Irving by Nov. 30. Naval Group and Fincantieri did not follow that requirement.

The Canadian government announced Tuesday it had rejected the proposal from the two firms. “The submission of an unsolicited proposal at the final hour undermines the fair and competitive nature of this procurement suggesting a sole source contracting arrangement,” Public Services and Procurement Canada, or PSPC, which is overseeing the procurement, said in a statement. “Acceptance of such a proposal would break faith with the bidders who invested time and effort to participate in the competitive process, put at risk the Government’s ability to properly equip the Royal Canadian Navy and would establish a harmful precedent for future competitive procurements.”

Canada’s decision effectively removes Naval Group and Fincantieri from taking part in the program since the companies never submitted a formal bid, government officials noted.

Public Services and Procurement Canada declined to say how many bids were received for the Canadian Surface Combatant project. Besides a bid from the BAE-Lockheed Martin Canada consortium for the Type 26 frigate, only two other companies have acknowledged bidding.

A team led by Alion Canada is offering the Dutch De Zeven Provinciën-class air-defense and command frigate. The Spanish shipyard, Navantia, has submitted a bid based on its F-105 frigate design.

Canada expects to make a decision on the winning bid sometime in 2018.

The program to build 15 new warships is estimated to be worth CAN$62 billion (U.S. $49 billion). The program was originally estimated to cost CAN$26 billion, but that figure has been revised a number of times and has been climbing steadily over the last several years.

Fincantieri and Naval Group had hoped the proposal of a fixed price tag of about CAN$30 billion for a new fleet might sway the Liberal government, as it would eliminate much of the risk and would offer a proven warship design. The proposal had the backing of the French and Italian governments and was made directly to Canadian Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan.

Naval Group and Fincantieri took note Canada had rejected their joint bid that filed outside the competition for a frigate fleet, but they were still ready to offer the design of their warship for local assembly, the companies said Wednesday.

“We acknowledge the position expressed by the Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) not to take into consideration the offers submitted outside the process of the Canadian Surface Combatant program (CSC) Request For Proposal (RFP),” Naval Group and Fincantieri said.

“Nevertheless, Naval Group and Fincantieri remain at the disposal of Canada to contribute to the modernization of Canadian forces with a sea-proven warship, currently in service with the French and Italian Navies, that would minimize the scheduling gaps for design and construction of all the ships in Canada and maximize value for money,” the companies said.

Asked on Wednesday how Fincantieri and Naval Group will react to Canada’s rejection, Fincantieri CEO Giuseppe Bono declined to give a direct response but did suggest there might be room for compromise.

“We don’t want to take risks,” he said, adding: “we need to see what makes sense” and “the customer is always right.”

In addition, he said the design of the ship offered to Canada would be more similar to the Italian version than the French.
“We have made a joint offer of a FREMM, which is close to the Italian version if only because Italy has an anti-submarine warfare version,” he said.

The terms of the Canadian competition posed a problem as the tender required bidders to hand over intellectual property and there was danger it might end up in the wrong hands, an analyst said.

“The problem from the outset is how the Liberals have set the competition,” said Robbin Laird, of consultancy International Communications and Strategic Assessments, based in Paris and the Washington, D.C., area.

“One would think that with … the U.S. and Australia launching new frigates as well as the French and Italians working on a new frigate program, the approach would be to leverage the allied global recapitalization effort,” he added. “Yet what the Canadian government has focused upon is simply forcing competitors to provide intellectual property to their own Canadian shipyard without any real protection against leakage of that technology to China or to other competitors.”

In their direct bid to the Canadian government, the European partners offered a speedy start of shipbuilding in 2019, which they said would help sustain local jobs. A frigate generally takes about four years to build.

The Franco-Italian frigate was offered with the Thales Sea Fire radar, a multifunction digital system, an industry executive said. Naval Group offered its Senit combat management system, with Fincantieri delivering the ship design.

Thales developed the flat-paneled Sea Fire for the FTI, an intermediate frigate ordered for the French Navy and aimed mainly for export markets.

Anti-submarine systems included Thales Captas hull-mounted and towed array sonars, specialist website Mer et Marine reported. The weapons could include a 127mm gun and two vertical launchers for surface-to-air missiles, which would likely be Aster but would also be available for American weapons.
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[*] posted on 8-12-2017 at 06:56 PM


Published: Friday, 08 December 2017 09:23

CSC: Alion Submits Proposal based on De Zeven Provinciën-class Frigate

Alion Science and Technology, along with its subsidiary Alion Canada, is pleased to confirm that it submitted a proposal for the Canadian Surface Combatant program on November 30. “Our solution delivers an effective, affordable, production-ready 21st century naval capability to meet Canada’s defence needs,” said Bruce Samuelsen, Chief Operating Officer for Alion. “Underlying the Alion offering is an unrelenting focus on affordability, risk reduction and Canadian content, grounded in nearly 50 years of experience designing and producing combatants. We feel confident this ship provides a secure and supportive foundation for the objectives of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.”


The Alion solution is based on the De Zeven Provinciën-class frigate— a proven NATO vessel, built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding. Alion image.

Canada selected a Military-Off-the-Shelf (MOTS) procurement model to reduce cost, improve delivery schedules and meet performance requirements. In addition, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) developed an objective, comprehensive evaluation model to assess the ship and combat system. “In our proposal, we wanted to ensure the offering covered the RCN’s requirements while also delivering the flexibility to adapt to emerging missions in the coming decades,” said Samuelsen,

The Alion solution is based on the De Zeven Provinciën-class frigate— a proven NATO vessel, built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding, with more than 10 years of operational excellence. Damen’s knowledge and design-for-production experience is made available to Canada through their key role as part of Alion’s team.


Alion’s combat system solution is based on the world-class capabilities of ATLAS-Elektronik and Hensoldt Sensors.

Alion’s combat system solution is based on the world-class capabilities of ATLAS-Elektronik and Hensoldt Sensors. ATLAS brings an outstanding, globally renowned open architecture Combat Management System that readily accepts new and evolving technologies. Hensoldt’s capability and experience in developing and fielding state-of-the art radars was central to meeting the unique Canadian requirements with a fielded, non-developmental radar. Other key suppliers include L3 Technologies Canada, Raytheon Canada Limited, DRS Technologies Canada Limited (DRS TCL) and Rheinmetall Canada Inc.

“Each decision we made for equipment selection and systems integration focused on delivering cost-effective solutions that meet the requirements while delivering robust Canadian content,” said Samuelsen. “Many original system suppliers are building systems in Canada, but our combat system partners are actually creating manufacturing jobs for Canadians.” In fact, Alion Canada provides the only domestic surface combatant ship design capability that will create additional high technology jobs through the CSC program, by including dozens of Canadian companies.

By selecting a ship with proven operational and combat experience, Alion’s solution also eliminates the risk associated with the typical lead-ship transition from design to production. “Our bid focused on reducing development and design activities, which delivers a lower overall cost,” said Samuelsen. “This is also significant from the standpoint of accelerating production.”

Using a locally developed, globally delivered business model, Alion is proud to leverage its permanent presence in Canada and a long history in advanced technologies and ship design to maximize Canadian content and further grow new, permanent, high-value skills and jobs in Canada.
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[*] posted on 30-12-2017 at 12:27 PM


MV Asterix arrives in Halifax, will begin RCN training in January

David Carl - Jane's Navy International

29 December 2017

The Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN’s) Resolve-class auxiliary oiler replenishment vessel (AOR) MV Asterix arrived at Canadian Forces Base Halifax on 27 December and will begin at-sea training in the new year. The ship was crewed by 36 Canadian merchant seafarers on its maiden voyage from Quebec City to Halifax, during which time the crew completed the testing of the vessel’s propulsion, navigation, and military systems.

The merchant sailors will be joined by 100 sailors from the RCN in January to begin integration training for approximately one month, after which Asterix will begin supporting RCN operations. The vessel is being leased by the RCN from Federal Fleet Services for a period of 10 years, with an option to purchase that can be exercised at any time.

(149 of 429 words)
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 05:40 PM


The Royal Canadian Navy's New Mothership Sails, On Time and to Budget

(Source: Davie Shipbuilding; issued Dec. 26, 2017)


Asterix is the first new naval support ship to enter service with the Royal Canadian Navy in over 50 years, and is also the first large naval platform to be delivered from a Canadian shipyard in over 20 years. (Davie photo)

LÉVIS, QC. --- Davie Shipbuilding - Canada's leading shipbuilder - today announced that it has completed the construction, commissioning and sea-trials of the first Resolve-Class Naval Support Ship, Asterix. The ship was delivered on time, to budget and most importantly, at an internationally competitive cost. The ship departed Québec City 23 December 2017 en-route to Canadian Forces Base Halifax where she will enter service with the Royal Canadian Navy and be operated by Federal Fleet Services Inc.

Her crew of 36 Canadian merchant sailors together with Davie personnel and industry contractors sailed the 26,000-tonne ship on her maiden voyage. During the journey, they completed the testing of her propulsion and navigation systems and state-of-the-art military systems. Upon arrival in Halifax, the ship will welcome aboard members of the Royal Canadian Navy to begin integration training during the month of January 2018 prior to supporting Canadian naval operations from February 2018, for the next 10 years.

The delivery of Asterix represents the first new naval support ship to enter service with the Royal Canadian Navy in over 50 years. It is also the first large naval platform to be delivered from a Canadian shipyard in over 20 years and the first naval ship to be delivered since the launch of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

"The delivery of this ship is an innovation showcase for Canadian industry and marks an important new era in Canadian maritime power, for it once again allows the Royal Canadian Navy to independently deploy globally for combat, peacekeeping and humanitarian operations. To see the Resolve-Class as just another naval ship is too simplistic. It is truly a force multiplier which will provide a globally deployable operating base for the Canadian Forces," said Spencer Fraser, CEO of Federal Fleet Services Inc.

The Resolve-Class Naval Support Ship, Asterix, was designed by Rolls Royce to meet the highest and most stringent of NATO and Lloyds Register requirements to support military operations, specifically for its primary Replenishment-At-Sea functionality but also in terms of systems redundancy, damage control, ammunition storage and other systems onboard.

"This is a proving point for Davie. When we began this program, we looked at what DND had been planning with the Joint Support Ships since 2005 and we quickly realized that the 26-year old German design could be improved upon. For example, having only two replenishment-at-sea stations would mean that it does not fully meet the latest NATO requirements, which crucially calls for four stations. So, we set out to build an innovative, modern design of a naval support ship with the latest, state-of-the-art systems that would be fully compliant to meet Canada's international and NATO commitments yet also provide a purpose-built platform for responding to humanitarian crises.

“We wanted to deliver a ship which would rival or exceed the best of the world's naval support ships. Working closely with our partners in the RCN, the Canadian government and Canadian industry from coast-to coast, we can state categorically that we achieved our goals today," commented Alex Vicefield, Chairman of Davie Shipbuilding.

Key facts:

-- The construction of Asterix was entirely privately financed; whereby for the first time in modern Canadian procurement history, all the technical and financial risk was borne by the companies involved - Davie and Federal Fleet Services. Unlike other current marine projects, the Canadian taxpayer has not been asked to pay a single cent until the ship is ready and able to meet the needs of the RCN.

-- IHS Markit (Jane's), the leading global naval and defence analysis firm, assessed the Resolve-Class Naval Support Ship to be, in all respects, on a par with the world's best naval support ships.

-- The Resolve-Class Naval Support ship took 24 months to deliver and employed over 1000 Canadian shipbuilders at Davie and provided contracts to 918 Canadian suppliers across the country.

-- Following common practice, also adopted by Canada's key allies including the US Navy and Royal Navy, the vessel was converted using the hull from a modern, high quality and ice-strengthened containership. During the conversion, the ship was stripped down to its keel and rebuilt in a modular fashion, installing the same key Canadian military systems that will be installed on Canada's future naval fleet such as OSI of Vancouver's Integrated Tactical and Navigation System, L3 MAPPS of Montreal's Integrated Platform Management System and Hepburn of Toronto's Replenishment-At-Sea Systems.

-- Other innovative features include an extensive intermodal handling area that is accessible at sea (a first within NATO), Canada's first at sea hospital facility (with a full operating theatre) and an advanced aviation capability which is able to land all of the RCAF's helicopters (including Chinooks).

-- A fully redundant electrical power plant and propulsion system were also installed to preclude the possibility of a recurrence of a complete power plant failure that struck HMCS PROTECTEUR in February 2014.

-- Asterix will also be the Canadian Government's most "Green Ship" and features, amongst other environmental innovations, Terragon of Montreal's MAGS 8 waste management system.

-- Like the Joint Support Ship, the ship is capable of being fitted with a range of active and passive self-defence systems, including three Raytheon Phalanx 20mm Close-In Weapon Systems.

-- The ship will remain under the ownership of Federal Fleet Services and be operated by a mixed crew of Canadian merchant seafarers and Royal Canadian Navy personnel for at least the next 10 years. The ship has a service life of 40 years.

-- Canada has the option to purchase the vessel at any time during or upon termination of the lease. At a value of $659m today, Asterix's price is a fraction of the cost of the currently planned Joint Support Ships (2013 PBO estimate indicates a 50% probability that each JSS will cost over $2.1B each).

-- While Asterix remains under the ownership of Federal Fleet Services, it will fly the company's House Ensign and be referred to as Motor Vessel Asterix.

-- Davie and Federal Fleet Services fully support the government's new defence policy - Strong, Secure, Engaged - which calls for at least two naval supply ships, though most naval experts would agree that Canada requires four such vessels to simultaneously ensure availability on both coasts, form international task groups and provide redundancy during maintenance periods.

Due to program delays and limited shipbuilding capacity under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the first Joint Support Ship will likely not be delivered before 2026 at the very earliest and possibly as late as 2028. As such, Davie has offered to build a second Resolve-Class Naval Support Ship for the Royal Canadian Navy in order to mitigate the need for Canada to rent supplementary ships from the Chilean and Spanish navies over the next decade.

Federal Fleet Services supports military, government and humanitarian operations through the construction, ownership, servicing and management of complex, mission-critical ships. Federal Fleet Services is the Canadian At-Sea Support Services Provider, providing a fully operated Naval Support Ship for the Royal Canadian Navy from 2017. Federal Fleet Services is part of the Inocea Group of Companies which also owns Davie Shipbuilding Canada's largest and highest capacity shipbuilder.

Davie is Canada's largest, highest capacity and most experienced shipbuilder. In 2015, Davie won the prestigious title of Lloyds List North American Shipyard of the Year. Over the past five-years, Davie has generated over $2bn in economic benefit to Canada and directly and indirectly employs over 3,000 Canadians, including over 1,400 who work at the shipyard in Levis, Québec. Davie has been Canada's shipbuilder and ship-repairer for every class of major naval platform over the past century. Today, Davie is an industry leader in icebreaking, LNG and dynamic positioning technologies as well as naval and other mission-critical shipbuilding. Davie is ISO 9001:2015 certified for Quality Assurance and ISO 14001:2015 for Environmental Management.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 05:42 PM


Using the future Joint Support Ships as a comparison is a nonsense..............they need to compare it to something like the new MARS AOR's the Brits have got to get a "sensible" comparison................

I'd love to know what they think in the USN or RN has been converted from a commercial vessel hull, as they have intimated in the article? Both the RN and USN build AOR's as dedicated tankers, and all of the newest ones are dedicated designs NOT conversions.
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 09:26 PM


It's a mastubatory printed wank from the people who did the conversion work.

Self awareness of their failings and lies are NOT to be expected.




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