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[*] posted on 19-9-2018 at 09:23 AM


First Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel Launched for Royal Canadian Navy

Posted On Tuesday, 18 September 2018 08:39

Canada’s lead Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, was launched Sept. 15, 2018, marking a significant milestone for the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and the revitalization of the Royal Canadian Navy’s combatant fleet.


The future HMCS Harry DeWolf, was launched Sept. 15, 2018

At 103 metres and 6,615 tonne, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf is the largest Royal Canadian Navy ship built in Canada in 50 years. The ship was transitioned from our land level facility to a submersible barge yesterday, Sept. 14, 2018, and launched in the Bedford Basin today.

The lead ship in the Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship program is now pier side at Halifax Shipyard where our shipbuilders will continue working to prepare the ship for sea trials in 2019.

HMCS Harry DeWolf is scheduled to be turned over to the Royal Canadian Navy in summer 2019.

Construction of the second and third ships, the future HMCS Margaret Brooke and Max Bernays, are well underway at Halifax Shipyard. Later this month, the first two major sections of the future HMCS Margaret Brooke will be moved outside.

VIDEO: Future HMCS Harry DeWolf AOPS First Launch 15 Sept 18: https://youtu.be/xlWHtVb4p0I
Future HMCS Harry DeWolf AOPS Launch 15 Sept 18

The National Shipbuilding Strategy was created to replace the current surface fleets of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard. Through a competitive, open and transparent process, Irving Shipbuilding was selected to construct the Royal Canadian Navy’s future combatant fleet—Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessels followed by Canadian Surface Combatants.

As a result of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, Irving Shipbuilding has become one of Atlantic Canada’s largest regional employers, with thousands of Canadians now working in skilled, well-paying jobs. The Halifax Shipyard, long at the centre of Canadian shipbuilding, is now revitalized and home to the most modern, innovative shipbuilding facilities, equipment, and processes in North America.
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[*] posted on 19-9-2018 at 01:06 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
First Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel Launched for Royal Canadian Navy

Posted On Tuesday, 18 September 2018 08:39

Canada’s lead Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, was launched Sept. 15, 2018, marking a significant milestone for the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and the revitalization of the Royal Canadian Navy’s combatant fleet.


The future HMCS Harry DeWolf, was launched Sept. 15, 2018


A couple of these is just what we need. Call them research vessels, survey vessels, whatever. Base them in Hobart… or Melbourne… oh alright, South Australia then. :smilegrin:
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[*] posted on 19-9-2018 at 01:21 PM


As a result of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, Irving Shipbuilding has become one of Atlantic Canada’s largest regional employers, with thousands of Canadians now working in skilled, well-paying jobs. The Halifax Shipyard, long at the centre of Canadian shipbuilding, is now revitalized and home to the most modern, innovative shipbuilding facilities, equipment, and processes in North America.

That will come as a hell of a surprise to any number of US shipbuilders.




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[*] posted on 3-10-2018 at 08:14 PM


Corner Brook to receive first Victoria-class fit of new modular mast

Dr. Lee Willett, London - Jane's Navy International

02 October 2018

Key Points

- The Royal Canadian Navy Victoria-class submarine HMCS Corner Brook is to be fitted with the L3 Calzoni Universal Modular Mast, acquired under the US Foreign Military Sales (FMS) programme
- The system will provide extremely high-frequency satcom capability for the RCN’s submarines

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) diesel-electric submarine (SSK) HMCS Corner Brook is to become the first Victoria-class boat to receive a new modular communications mast.

The L3 Calzoni Universal Modular Mast (UMM) has been acquired via the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) programme with the US Navy (USN). The new mast is being fitted while Corner Brook undergoes deep maintenance in an extended docking and work period (EDWP) at Victoria Shipyards in Esquimalt, British Columbia.

(141 of 678 words)
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[*] posted on 5-10-2018 at 10:08 PM


Canada gives green light to Halifax-class frigate ASW upgrade

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

05 October 2018

A team led by General Dynamics Mission Systems-Canada has been contracted to deliver a major anti-submarine warfare (ASW) upgrade for the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN's) 12 Halifax-class frigates.

The Underwater Warfare Suite Upgrade (UWSU) is designed to provide the Halifax-class ships with an improved ASW capability through the upgrade and/or replacement of the components of the underwater warfare sensor suite. The intention is to restore a tactical advantage over threat submarines, and provide improved survivability against underwater weapons.

The scope of the UWSU programme covers the delivery of an integrated system that replaces the current towed array sensor and sonobuoy processing system, adds additional active intercept sensors, and improves the processing and transmission control system of the existing AN/SQS-510 hull-mounted sonar.

(121 of 532 words)
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[*] posted on 16-10-2018 at 06:41 PM


Canadian frigate delayed again

Ian Keddie, Toronto - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

15 October 2018

Canadian frigate delayed again:no:

A long-awaited decision on the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) frigate replacement programme has been delayed once more, although it is unclear for how long.

In the official Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) update document released on 27 September, PSPC indicated no CSC design would be chosen in third quarter 2018, after indicating to Jane’s in May 2018 that a decision would be made at that time.

In the update document, ‘The National Shipbuilding Strategy in 2018,’ which outlines the state of the federal shipbuilding plan, the PSPC said, “Request for Proposals to select the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) design and design team has closed.

(129 of 390 words)
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[*] posted on 17-10-2018 at 11:35 AM


Irving Shipbuilding pushing for two more Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships, all Halifax-class work

DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN Updated: October 16, 2018



Efforts are underway by Irving Shipbuilding to convince the federal government to build two more Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships at its Halifax yard. Irving also wants all Halifax-class frigate maintenance work to remain with the yard in Nova Scotia.

The federal government is looking at splitting up maintenance work on the Canadian navy’s frigates between Irving and Davie in Quebec. It is facing objections from Irving and its workers. The Irving employees warn the change will mean lost jobs in Nova Scotia.

There are seven frigates that will need maintenance on the east coast over a five-year period. But military and Department of National Defence officials are concerned the Irving yard in Halifax won’t be able to handle all the work as it will also be in the midst of building the new fleet of Canadian Surface Combatant warships. There are concerns that the navy’s capabilities could suffer if the work isn’t split up between Davie and Irving yards.

Each of the aging Halifax-class frigates will require about a year of maintenance work, and in 2020 the navy expects maintenance will be needed on two frigates at the same time.

Irving argues it needs all the Halifax-class work and the construction of two more AOPS so it doesn’t face any downturn in activity at the yard. “ We are hopeful that the Government of Canada will continue the work at Halifax Shipyard,” Irving spokesman Sean Lewis said of the frigate maintenance.

Asked about the need for two more AOPS, Lewis stated the following: “We continue to work closely with the Government of Canada to explore the overall transition between the Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) and Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) programs. The construction of additional AOPS for Canada or international export opportunities is being considered and various options pursued. At this time it is premature to comment further.”

In response to Irving’s push, Davie official Frédérik Boisvert has noted that while Irving has $ 65 billion in contracts from the federal government and 1900 workers, Davie has received less than $ 1billion in contracts and has less than 200 people working and 1400 laid off workers, waiting to be recalled. “If they (Irving) are concerned about Nova Scotian jobs, they should explain to their union workers why they are building their own tugs in Eastern Europe,” Boisvert added.

(The first AOPS is shown above – Irving photo)
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 10:05 AM
The Canadian Government has unveiled the preferred design and bidder to build fifteen new surface combatants




Lockheed Martin Canada and partner BAE Systems have been selected to provide the design and design team for the Royal Canadian Navy’s future Canadian Surface Combatants.

Canada’s new generation of surface combatants will be based on the BAE Systems’ Type 26 Global Combat Ship design.

Irving Shipbuilding has been mandated by the Canadian Government to supply the shipbuilding services.

The announcement follows the decision made by the Australian Government in June 2018 to select BAE Systems and the Type 26, to be known as the Hunter class in Australian service, as the successful bidder for the $35 billion SEA 5000 Future Frigate program.

The new Canadian Surface Combatant fleet will replace the Iroquois and Halifax-class warships and provide wide-area air defence, anti-submarine warfare and anti-shipping capability.

While the announcement of the preferred Canadian bidder represents a significant milestone in the competitive process, more work is required before a contract is awarded.

Lockheed Martin Canada Inc., the lead contractor on the Canadian ship building program, must now go through a significant 'due diligence process', which includes:

• Negotiations with the government on intellectual property rights
• An assessment of combat systems performance
• An assessment of the company’s financial capability to deliver the project, together with the verification of various other administrative matters

Should the preferred bidder Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems not successfully demonstrate to Canada and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. that it meets all of the due diligence requirements, then the next highest ranked compliant bidder will become the preferred bidder.

That business will then have to successfully demonstrate that it meets all of the due diligence requirements.

The two other organisations that provided proposals included Alion Canada and Damen Group with a bid based on the Dutch De Zeven Provincien-class frigate design as well as Navsntia, who offered a solution based on the Spanish F-105 frigate.

A contract award is expected this winter, with construction beginning in the early 2020s.

The Canadian Surface Combatant project is the largest, most complex procurement ever undertaken by the Government of Canada.

These ships will form the backbone of the Royal Canadian Navy and will be Canada’s major surface component of maritime combat power for decades to come.

More to come.
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 01:54 PM


Wow! Three hits for BAE.................will the Kiwi's follow in a few years?
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 02:45 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Wow! Three hits for BAE.................will the Kiwi's follow in a few years?

Yep, I was wondering the same thing. The other thing I wonder, is whether the USN are going to re-visit their exclusion of the Type 26 from the FFG(X) program.
Regardless, the Type 26 user group meetings are going to be a blast.
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 03:25 PM


Is it just me… or with the Canadians being Canadians, should we save the hoopla until the contract is signed? ;)
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 03:46 PM


Signing the contract is not usually the problem, building on time is................just an observation
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 06:11 PM


Pretty pic time.............



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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 07:27 PM


The sudden turn around from export amateurs to the worlds stellar performer is simply impossible to comprehend! For my money the Canadian version is the best looker. Intriguingly, although LM has long announced a large industrial team, they haven’t named a radar supplier.

Still in shock !
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[*] posted on 20-10-2018 at 11:42 PM


Quote: Originally posted by JimWH  
Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Wow! Three hits for BAE.................will the Kiwi's follow in a few years?

Yep, I was wondering the same thing. The other thing I wonder, is whether the USN are going to re-visit their exclusion of the Type 26 from the FFG(X) program.
Regardless, the Type 26 user group meetings are going to be a blast.


Their ANZAC’s have barely started their MLU and I wonder if they have got over their sticker shock on the P-8A yet...

So I doubt we’ll see the Kiwis jump on board any time soon...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 10:39 AM


Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  

Their ANZAC’s have barely started their MLU and I wonder if they have got over their sticker shock on the P-8A yet...

So I doubt we’ll see the Kiwis jump on board any time soon...

That's very true, but the production run for the Type 26 is going to be fairly long. Our last units wont be rolling off the line until the late 2030s realistically, and the same will be true of the Canadians. Even post MLU they'll need to be looking to replace their Anzacs by the mid to late 2030s.
The Kiwis could plausibly tack on an order for a couple of ships on the end of any of the three lines that will be running, choose the bits they want (for instance CMS 330, SeaCeptor, and their preferred radar solution) and delete the bits they don't (can't see them being much interested in TLAM or the Type 2087 towed array), and walk away quite happy. They'd get a ship with a large user group, it'd benefit from large economies of scale, will likely be a fair bit cheaper than the ships being built now being on the back end of a large learning curve, abd they'd be able to access yards in Australia and Canada able to do deep refit when required.
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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 12:28 PM


Quote: Originally posted by JimWH  
Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  

Their ANZAC’s have barely started their MLU and I wonder if they have got over their sticker shock on the P-8A yet...

So I doubt we’ll see the Kiwis jump on board any time soon...

That's very true, but the production run for the Type 26 is going to be fairly long. Our last units wont be rolling off the line until the late 2030s realistically, and the same will be true of the Canadians. Even post MLU they'll need to be looking to replace their Anzacs by the mid to late 2030s.
The Kiwis could plausibly tack on an order for a couple of ships on the end of any of the three lines that will be running, choose the bits they want (for instance CMS 330, SeaCeptor, and their preferred radar solution) and delete the bits they don't (can't see them being much interested in TLAM or the Type 2087 towed array), and walk away quite happy. They'd get a ship with a large user group, it'd benefit from large economies of scale, will likely be a fair bit cheaper than the ships being built now being on the back end of a large learning curve, abd they'd be able to access yards in Australia and Canada able to do deep refit when required.


I agree it’s a good idea, I’m just not sure they are emotionally invested enough in defence to go for such high end ships at the dollar value they will command. I can still hear the teeth grinding from having to pay so much for the P-8A’s and they are still procastinating on their long overdue Hercules / B-757 replacement...

T31’s or similar would suit them much better from this viewpoint, I suspect.




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 01:42 PM


Depends on what eventually happens to T-31, and which design gets selected..............T-26 may be the easier choice IF they decide 2030 onwards.............personally, I'm not sure T-31 will make it that far.
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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 05:52 PM


I think that the Kiwi's will not go for Type 26s or anything remotely as capable (or expensive). Basically they try and do Defence on the cheap.

I can see them going with either the new US FFX given it will be both cheaper than Type 26 and in series production (assuming it is the version of the USCG Bertholf class I expect to be selected) when they get around to a replacement or if not, they will go with some oversized OPV such as something like the Dutch Absalon class. To be honest buying an Absalon class instead of upgrading the Anzacs may have been a better deal for them, but it's Kiwi defence we're talking about.

Basically the Kiwi's are too cheap and too happy playing at soldiers to actually spend the money on quality kit. They could easily have plugged into our Anzac upgrades program and got an easy upgrade path to a world-class frigate and retained interoperability, but didn't want anything too war-ry.

They only bought the P8s because there was nothing else available with the range they needed. If there was, they would have bought it.

I know it sounds harsh, but I remember all the capabilities the Kiwi's threw away to save money (an air combat capability for one).

I mean they passed on C130J because they said it was too expensive...FFS








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[*] posted on 25-10-2018 at 11:46 AM


TYPE 26 GLOBAL COMBAT SHIP FOR CANADA



After a tortured and glacially slow procurement process the Canadian government announced on 19 October that the selected design for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) – the frigate-sized vessel that will form the backbone of the future Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) – is the Type 26 Global Combat Ship from BAE Systems. The company, in partnership with Lockheed Martin, which leads the consortium and will be the prime contractor, must now go through a due diligence phase and enter into detailed negotiations with Halifax-based Irving Shipbuilding, who will build the 15 vessels currently anticipated for the class.

CSC will replace both the IROQUOIS-class destroyers, which have already been retired and provided anti-air capabilities, and the HALIFAX-class patrol frigates, which were recently modernised providing anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities and multi-role mission support, with a single class of warship. Irving Shipbuilding Industries was selected as the prime contractor to build 12 frigates and three destroyers. According to Lockheed Martin Canada’s Vice President and General Manager, Gary Fudge, at Euronaval 2018, the, “design process will last three years and cutting steel in the timeframe 2021-24.”

Lockheed Martin’s ‘Canada’s Combat Ship Team’ bid combines the company’s longstanding expertise in naval integration and its Canadian developed Combat Management System CMS 330 with BAE Systems’ Type 26 Global Combat Ship and high-tech platforms from top-pedigree Canadian innovators CAE, MDA, L3 Technologies and Ultra Electronics. As there are commonalities with the Australian and British Type 26s (chosen by Australia for its Hunter-class SEA 5000 programme and the Royal Navy’s Global Combat Ship), the ship is, “extremely quiet and our most advanced frigate,” BAE Systems Canada Country Director Anne Healey told MONCh at Euronaval. As to the radar suite, Mr Fudge was only able to say that, “the existing radar does not meet Canada’s requirements.”

“The Type 26 was selected because of its modern design, adaptability, low acoustic signature, 3D modelling toolset, ability to learn from the other Commonwealth programmes, and only requiring 10% overall change to meet RCN needs,” Ms Healy continued.

Other official submissions came from Navantia teaming with Saab Australia offering the F-105 frigate design of the Spanish Navy and Alion offering the PROVINCIEN (LCF) -class of the Royal Netherlands Navy.


BAE Systems' Type 26 model at Euronaval 2018. (Photo: DPM).


Lockheed Martin's Type 26 model at Euronaval 2018. (Photo: DPM)

The underlying question remains whether all 15 can be funded. According to the government’s own figures, the cost of the programme has now risen to C$62 billion – more than twice the originally proposed budget. Strong arguments have been put forward to suggest that the cost is worth paying for the technological and commercial benefits it will bring to Canada’s shipbuilding industry. A detailed study commissioned from PricewaterhouseCoopers said much the same thing. The fact remains, however, that 15 vessels for $62 billion represents a cost at least double and arguably treble what anyone else is paying for similar capability. Anywhere. Several bidders withdrew from the programme and the government rejected an approach from Naval Group and Fincantieri that offered to build the vessels at a fixed (and much lower) unit cost.

To a degree, the cost can be somewhat justified by some (though not all) of the requirements the RCN has. As an example, the specification for the Infrared Search and Track (IRST) system pretty much pushes the envelope of what is currently possible to its outer edge. That kind of capability has to be paid for. The only question is whether that capability will ever be needed: if so, what value does one place on saving a human life? If not – how does the service – and the government – justify the lack of capability.

This programme will continue to generate controversy, argument and strong emotions. But it is at last underway, and MONCh and NAVAL FORCES will continue to monitor and report appropriately.
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[*] posted on 25-10-2018 at 02:16 PM


CA$4 billion a boat, impressive...



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[*] posted on 26-10-2018 at 04:40 PM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
CA$4 billion a boat, impressive...

Yeah, but the Canadians always include through life support for the first 150 years or so of the system in their figures. Plus the cost of ameliorating every moose which has to be moved off the slip way. And the cost of remediating any green space which has ever been used for war like activity. etc. etc.
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[*] posted on 26-10-2018 at 05:36 PM


..............plus an Allowance for all the returning ISIS members who have suffered hardship during their attempt to take over the world, the poor dears! :no:
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[*] posted on 30-10-2018 at 09:23 AM


With Russia in its crosshairs, Canada moves to buy a sub hunter

By: David B. Larter   6 hours ago


A rendering of the Canadian Type 26, on track to win Canada's frigate competition. (Courtesy of Lockheed Martin)

PARIS — The Royal Canadian Navy is moving toward Britain’s Type 26 frigate design, a multimission ship designed to cut through the water quietly, hunt submarines, and defend against hostile missiles and aircraft.

The Canadian government announced mid-October that a team led by Lockheed Martin Canada had been selected as the “preferred designer.” That team was offering up British defense firm BAE Systems’ Type 26 design.

To some, the selection of the Type 26 design was a surprise given that Britain only just began cutting steel for the first one last summer, and as with any new ship and design, there is a high potential for cost overruns and delays.

But the Arctic nation’s selection of a ship that is a purpose-built sub hunter could be a sign that it is willing to accept those risks because of the strategic threat Russia poses to Canada’s interests at the rapidly thawing top of the world.

“For the Canadians, anti-submarine warfare is a big deal,” said Bryan Clark, a retired U.S. submarine officer and analyst with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. “If you are worried about the Russian sub threat and the air threat, then, yeah, the Type 26 makes sense.”

Indeed, BAE executives here said a big part of Type 26 is its anti-submarine warfare-friendly design elements.

“That was a huge discriminator for us,” Anne Healey, a vice president with BAE Systems, told a roundtable of reporters at the Euronaval conference. “We are extremely quiet and we are probably the world’s most advanced frigate … and that’s a key element of what sets us apart and what’s valued by the Canadian Navy.”

The ASW features were also a big factor for Australia, which is locked in a standoff with China over its actions in the South and East China seas, vital sea lanes for the Pacific nation.

The shift toward ASW is part of an industry trend, said Gary Fudge, a vice president with Lockheed Martin Canada.

“For the last 15 years, most allied navies have put their efforts into anti-air warfare, whereas the threat that has emerged in the last 15 years is largely in submarine technologies,” Fudge said. "So we wake up 15 years later finding that the focus has gone into anti-air, but the real threat is in submarines.

“The number of submarines produced in the 15 years is phenomenal, and now the world has woken up and it doesn’t have the same ASW capability anymore and it hasn’t kept pace with the anti-air warfare technology. So Canada is very interested in getting back on track.”

All told, Canada wants to buy up to 15 frigates with a notional total program cost of $60 billion all in. And while the selection of Lockheed and BAE is a big win for the companies, the project could still fall through as the program enters an evaluation phase where Lockheed’s bid will be examined, and Canada’s requirements will be reviewed to ensure that Type 26 is the best bet.

The final decision should come some time over the winter, according to a report by the Canadian Broadcast Corporation.

But assuming the contract moves forward, it would mean three of the “Five Eyes” countries — the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada — will operate Type 26 frigates. (The United States — which passed on the Type 26 design during its frigate competition — and New Zealand are the other two counties in the intelligence sharing pact.)

Risk

Clark, the CSBA analyst, said the selection of Type 26 was in some ways surprising because of the potential for cost overruns.

“It’s not yet a proven ship, and you are taking a ship that is not even built yet and making it the basis of your frigate program,” Clark said. “It is a little surprising, especially for a country that might lack the wherewithal and the funding for potential cost and schedule overruns.”

But BAE thinks Canada will be in good shape because the British and Australian programs are underway, meaning Canada should be able to avoid early mistakes through shared lessons learned. Furthermore, not much in the way of design changes were needed to meet the Canadian requirement.

“The amount of design change that we are doing is only 10 percent, so it’s going to represent a very low risk in terms of the alterations that are being made,” Healey said.

By way of comparison, the U.S. Navy had to change about 40 percent of the design of its DDG Flight IIA to incorporate the new SPY-6 radar in Flight III.
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[*] posted on 3-11-2018 at 11:24 AM


Canada’s Halifax-Class Frigates: Ready for Duty, Now and in the Future

(Source: Public Services and Procurement Canada; issued Nov 01, 2018)

GATINEAU, Quebec --- Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of National Defence, has issued Advance Contract Award Notices (ACANs) to Irving Shipbuilding Inc., of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Chantier Davie Canada Inc., of Lévis, Quebec, and Seaspan Victoria Shipyards, of Victoria, British Columbia, for maintenance support services for Canada’s 12 Halifax-class frigates.

The combined value of the three contracts will be approximately $7 billion (including taxes).

These contracts will be awarded under the repair, refit and maintenance component of the NSS and will ensure that maintenance and engineering work continue on the 12 Halifax-class frigates until the replacement Canadian Surface Combatant ships are delivered.

These notices follow extensive industry engagement, which began in December 2016. Based on these consultations, it was determined that these three Canadian shipyards possess the required workforce and infrastructure necessary to conduct the work on the Halifax-class frigates.

The ACANs confirm Canada’s intention to enter into a contract with each of the three identified Canadian shipyards. Other interested suppliers have 15 calendar days to signal their interest in bidding for this contract, by submitting a “statement of capabilities” that meets the requirements laid out in the ACANs.

Quotes

“Through the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the process of renewing fleets for the Royal Canadian Navy over the next 30 years is underway across the country. Our Government’s long-term commitment to maintaining an agile and responsive naval force will provide the Royal Canadian Navy and its sailors with the reliable ships they need to do their jobs while protecting the interests of all Canadians,” said Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility.

“We are ensuring that the women and men of our Royal Canadian Navy are equipped with the ships they need to serve Canadians. Our Government is taking measures to ensure that our modernized Halifax-class frigates are able to continue to protect Canadian waters and contribute significantly to international operations. These contracts will ensure that our frigates remain operationally ready while increasing the number of jobs and strengthening the ship maintenance capacity in Canada as outlined in our National Shipbuilding Strategy,” said Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence.

Quick facts

--The Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy, including Value Proposition, will be applied to this procurement.

--Periodic docking maintenance work periods are essential to ensure the Halifax-class frigates are available and reliable during their operational cycle and deployments.

--The RCN has 12 Halifax-class frigates; seven are stationed in Halifax, Nova Scotia, while the five are stationed in Esquimalt, British Columbia.

--The RCN requires that at least eight of 12 frigates are able to deploy at all times to meet the Navy’s commitment to the Government of Canada.

--The ships require a wide range of engineering change work, equipment installations, docking work and corrective maintenance activities to ensure that they remain operationally available and relevant through to end of life.

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