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Author: Subject: Canadian Navy, 2017 onwards
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[*] posted on 17-7-2019 at 07:39 PM


$1.5 billion in frigate repair contracts split between yards in three provinces

Feds announce $500M contract for Victoria shipyard

The Canadian Press

Published Tuesday, July 16, 2019 4:15AM EDT
Last Updated Tuesday, July 16, 2019 4:54PM EDT



OTTAWA -- Warship repair contracts worth $1 billion will be split evenly between two shipyards, with a third deal on the way, the federal government announced Tuesday.

The Davie shipyard in Quebec and Seaspan Victoria Shipyards in British Columbia were each awarded a $500-million contract for maintenance work on the country's fleet of 12 Halifax-class frigates.

A similar deal with Irving Shipyards in Nova Scotia is being finalized now, the government said. In an emailed statement, Irving said details of its contract with the government would be released "in the near future."

Seaspan employees look towards the HMCS Vancouver before an announcement about investing more than $7.5 billion into the Royal Canadian Navy's 12 Halifax-class frigates to provide ongoing maintenance until they are retired in 2040s as members from government and staff gather during a press conference at Seaspan's Victoria Shipyard in Victoria, B.C., on Tuesday July 16, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
The contracts announced Tuesday cover a five-year period, with the value expected to rise as the government adds more work.

The federal government has promised to invest $7.5 billion to maintain the 12 frigates over the remainder of their operational lifespans, which are expected to last about 20 more years.

The oldest of the ships, HMCS Halifax, has been in service for 27 years. All recently underwent significant refits and modernizations.

Each shipyard will be responsible for refitting a minimum of three frigates each and work will begin in the early 2020s, the government announcement said.

In an emailed statement, Public Services and Procurement Canada said the work on the ships would be scheduled to ensure the fleet maintains operational readiness.

It said shipyards will be eligible for additional work based on performance.

"Each shipyard will have the opportunity to receive a minimum of $2 billion in maintenance contracts until the Halifax-class frigates (have) reached their end of the life cycle. The exact amount each shipyard receives will depend on several factors such as ship condition and performance," the statement said.

The Halifax-class frigates will eventually be replaced by new warships set for construction under the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

Davie was left out of the massive naval procurement program in 2011 because it was suffering from financial troubles at the time.
But it has since advocated to be allowed to participate in the wider program.

Cabinet minister and Quebec City Liberal MP Jean-Yves Duclos, who delivered the government announcement at the Davie facilities across the St. Lawrence River in Levis, Que., said parts of the National Shipbuilding Strategy have been delayed "because the Davie shipyard was excluded from the Conservative strategy for naval construction."

Duclos said this was an "error" that was "important to admit to" so that it could be more easily fixed.

That was part of why the government announced "structural investments that are long-term for Quebec, for Quebec City and for Canada as a whole," Duclos said.

Duclos won his riding by just under two percentage points in 2015.

Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough delivered the government's announcement at Seaspan Victoria Shipyards.

Qualtrough represents Delta, a riding in suburban Vancouver.

The government announcement said the investment will sustain or create 400 jobs at each shipyard.

With files from Giuseppe Valiante in Montreal
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[*] posted on 27-8-2019 at 11:02 AM


Ontario Shipyard Accuses Feds of Unfairly Stacking Deck In Davie’s Favour (excerpt)

(Source: The Canadian Press; published Aug 23, 2019)

By Lee Berthiaume

OTTAWA --- An Ontario shipyard is accusing the federal government of trying to unfairly award Quebec's Chantier Davie shipyard potentially billions of dollars in work without a competition.

The allegation is contained in a complaint from Hamilton-based Heddle Marine to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal over the government's search for a third shipyard to add to its multibillion-dollar shipbuilding strategy.

The winning yard, which will join Halifax's Irving Shipbuilding and Seaspan Marine in Vancouver in the massive naval procurement process, will be tasked with building six new icebreakers for the Canadian Coast Guard.

However, Heddle alleges in its complaint that many of the requirements the government says shipyards must meet to qualify for consideration are not legitimate or reasonable — and will disqualify virtually every yard but Davie.

It is asking the tribunal to order the removal of the requirements or the launch of a new search process.

The federal procurement department did not immediately respond to questions Friday. Davie declined to comment. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the National Observer website.

https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/08/24/news/ontario-shi...

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[*] posted on 15-11-2019 at 11:39 AM


Canadian Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship Delivery Delayed Again

(Source: Forecast International; issued Nov 13, 2019)

Delivery of Canada’s first Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) has been delayed yet again, and is not expected to take place until the end of March.

Delivery of the first ship was originally scheduled for summer 2019 but was pushed back to the end of 2019 before the latest delay. The delivery slip appears to stem from production challenges with the first-in-class ship.

A spokesman for Irving, the shipyard building the AOPS, said a final sea trial is anticipated in late January. After the sea trial, the ship will undergo final inspections prior to delivery. If this timeline remains intact, the ship will be ready to enter service in summer 2020.

Canada is building a fleet of six AOPS. Military officials have said they do not expect the latest delay to impact delivery of follow-on ships. The second ship is expected to be delivered in late 2020, followed by one ship per year between 2021 and 2024.

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[*] posted on 21-2-2020 at 10:05 PM



A 'Canadianised' Type 26 Frigate. Image via BAE.

Work starts on Rolls-Royce facility to support Canadian Type 26 Frigate build

By George Allison - February 21, 20205

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Rolls-Royce say it welcomed Canadian Minister Maryam Monsef to break ground on a new expansion to its Centre of Excellence for Naval Handling equipment in Peterborough, Ontario.

Design and manufacture of the Rolls-Royce Mission Bay Handling System (MBHS) will take place inside the new facility expansion say the firm.

“The MBHS is an innovative, adaptable and flexible feature of the Global Combat Ship design, selected for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC), Australian Hunter Class and UK Type 26 programs. The Canadian Federal Government has already selected the Global Combat Ship design for the Royal Canadian Navy’s 15 new CSC ships.

This significant investment in the expansion of infrastructure to support the CSC program demonstrates the company’s commitment to developing advanced industrial technologies to benefit the Canadian economy and Canada’s Armed Forces.”

Rolls-Royce say it has already expanded its supply chain in Canada to meet the significant domestic and international export opportunities created by the Global Combat Ship program, enabling the company to sustain significant growth of the Canadian economy well into the future.

Bruce Lennie, Rolls-Royce, Vice President, Business Development & Government Affairs said:

“We are pleased to welcome Minister Monsef, MPP Smith and Mayor Therrien to mark this significant milestone in developing our infrastructure which will support the Canadian Surface Combatant program. This Centre will harness and build upon the wealth of Canadian engineering and technological expertise we have at Rolls-Royce. We look forward to growing our business in country, further developing our supply chain and enhancing our contributions to the Canadian economy.”

The MBHS has the capability to launch and recover naval vehicles and move containerised packages without the aid of a dockside crane.



The multi-functional system can also be easily adapted to support custom operational requirements, such as humanitarian missions, by providing the space for medical facilities and aid supplies. Read more about the Mission Bay Handling System here.
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